Trouble with Titles and Covers

The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change comes out on 7th September. One of the hardest bits of writing our book was finding the right title. And another was agreeing the cover design. These two aspects of book production carry the first ideas of the book to possible readers. Despite their importance, for us, both title and cover came after we had finished the manuscript.

274 New Age

Finding the title

For most of its time, from first ideas, through the proposal and contract signing stages, and even as we were writing the chapters, our book was called Ageing now: the impact on individuals, families, communities and society. We had already rejected Positive Ageing and We’re Still Here, although that one made it as a chapter title. You can see where we were going with Ageing Now. But we knew it was not right, and asked the publisher to consider it a working title. What should the book be called?

This is a summary of the contents:

Our society, communities, family and individuals have much to gain and less to fear from our ageing population.

We give innovative ways of considering ageing, challenging widespread account of it as simply problematic and burdensome. We counter ageism and the political opportunism that obscures the opportunities and benefits of age. We reject the common belief that transitions into older age bring inevitable pain, loneliness, depression and dependency whilst recognising the challenges involved.

The book challenges common assumptions about ageing and offers a new vision for an age-inclusive society.

You can access a free copy of Chapter 4 called Time bombs and Agequakes: the economics of ageing: here.

The summary above hardly does justice to our arguments, and yet we had to compress it even further into a title. We wanted to find a title that told our readers that this book is about how all society is changing, and everyone will be affected by increased longevity. We did not want a title that suggested we were guiding people into a happier old age, although we hope it can contribute to that. So out went Positive Ageing, The Joys of Ageing and all associated suggestions. Other suggestions were rejected by the marketing people at Policy Press for not being strong enough.

The hunt for the title took many emails, many, many emails. I consulted my writing group. Emma said that even though we had not yet found the title, it would eventually reveal itself to us, we should be patient. And it did. An idea had come from Marianne’s husband, John. Finally we all agreed on The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change.

Turning pages of a book by Mummelgrummel, February 2013 via WikiCommons

Turning pages of a book by Mummelgrummel, February 2013 via WikiCommons

Cover

And then we had similar issues with the cover. Just for a moment consider what images you would put on a book about ageing. Older people? Older people being active? We were conscious of the clichéd image of older people on bicycles, tandems and motorcycles with sidecars. We have been writing about retiring and ageing for some years and our publications have been blessed with all these!

We learned about how difficult covers can be on a previous occasion. Some years ago Eileen and I wrote a book aimed at secondary schools. The publisher’s initial design showed primary age pupils looking very learningful. The brief to the designer must have omitted the relevant age.

The trouble with images of people on books is that they often represent stereotypes, or categories. Writing about social policy, changes to society and so on, we wanted an inclusive cover. If people are to be shown the reader has to see people of different ethnic origins, men and women in positive activities (I guess that’s where the bikes come in), in relationship with each other, and in our case, not representing the usual image of older people: passive, miserable, in decline.

230 road sign

We suggested no people. We suggested a neutral image: in our case it’s a rising or setting sun. And we were keen on getting a good strong colour, clear lettering and strong layout. Ideally we would have liked some of Eileen’s artwork, but this was beyond budget. We like the strength of the blue cover, and its ambiguous sun. I referred to the endorsement on the back cover in the previous post on marketing. We hope all this – title, design, blurby bits – will attract readers.

And finally …

… it’s all done. As I write this we are waiting for our printed copies to arrive. One has been seen somewhere in Britain. Publication day is only a few weeks ahead.

The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change, by Caroline Lodge, Eileen Carnell and Marianne Coleman will be published by Policy Press on 7th September 2016.

Copies of The New Age of Ageing will be available through the Policy Press website, at a 20% discount. It will cost £14.99 £11.99.

Related posts

On the Tricky Topic of Titles (November 2015)

We are writing monthly posts about the stages from bright ideas to publishing our book. Earlier posts include

Marketing our Book (August 2016)

Learning to be old by Eileen Carnell (July)

Ageing: it is not ‘them and us’, it is all ‘us’ by Marianne Coleman (June)

Getting feedback to improve our writing (May)

First Catch Your Publisher (April)

One Book, Three Authors (March)

Writers’ Residential (February)

 

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11 Comments

Filed under Books, Publishing our book, Writing

11 Responses to Trouble with Titles and Covers

  1. Barbara Lorna Hudson

    interesting. Thanks.I automatically assumed it was the rising,not setting, sun.
    I must be an optimist!

  2. Timely article for me, Caroline, as just at the stage of considering covers for my second novel (which is also likely to be blue and yellow). I still can’t make up my mind how important covers are, but I want mine to be striking, gorgeous and an accurate representation of the contents. It’s on the way!
    Exciting yours is so close. Good luck with it.

    • Caroline

      Hi Anne,
      you have a very striking cover for your first novel, although I am not sure it says anything about the content, but it doesn’t jar either.
      It sounds like your ideas for the cover have progressed smoothly. Look forward to seeing it.
      Caroline.

  3. How exciting to have publication arriving so soon! I wish you success with your book. Well done! I love the cover – it’s my favourite shade of blue!

  4. Lynda Haddock

    How exciting! And I love the cover – I too thought it was the sun rising!

  5. Terry Tyler

    Will it be out on Kindle? Suggest submitting to Rosie Amber’s review team ~ plenty of us ‘of a certain age’ there, who I am sure would like to read. I know I would!

    Congratulations on not going down the ‘old person on a skateboard’ route, for the cover. Ghastly and patronising, I’ve always thought!

    • Caroline

      Electronic version will be available. Thanks for the suggestion about the Rosie Amber review team.
      Can’t help mentioning that this isn’t a book just for people of a certain age: it’s about how increased longevity, more older people, will affect our society. So it’s for everyone. We know older people are currently experiencing some of the downsides and upsides of this. We talked to many older people for the book.
      Thanks for your comment. Old person on a skateboard – aaaaaah!
      Caroline.

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