Tag Archives: The Conchie Road

My New Bookish Project

It is with some trepidation that I go public with my new writing project. I am a publisher or rather Bookword is a new publisher. I am very conscious of the idea of vanity publishing. On the other hand I am enthusiastic about the possibilities for citizen publishing on a small scale. If technology makes it possible for more of us to publish, to rely less on the big 5 publishing commercially motivated companies, to spread the idea of independent publishing, then I am happy to give it a go.

And because my novel needs yet another revision it isn’t my first venture. Instead, and in time to give a copy to everyone I know over the age of 12 for Christmas, it’s a collection of 15 of my short stories written over the last 10 years and called Better Fetch A Chair.

Better Fetch A Chair

I published Better Fetch A Chair in early December 2018. The title is an old African saying. And I have taken the name of my blog as the name of the publishing venture Bookword. My main purpose is to have a physical book, containing my fiction, and I do not expect to make money from it. My other purpose is to learn about book production from start to finish. So this is what I did.

Bookword as Publisher

To set up my enterprise I did the following:

  1. ISBNs are useful because an ISBN will ensure that my book will be entered on various databases, including those used by booksellers and libraries. This will guarantee it a better profile. I bought 10 ISBNs from https://www.nielsenisbnstore.com. You can buy one for £89 or ten for £159. As I expect to publish more than one book in due time the choice was obvious. I also learned about making a legal deposit with the British Library.
  2. My collection of short stories needed a proofreader to check them through. I commissioned @Juliaproofreader aka Julia Gibbs to check my stories for accuracy and get them ready for printing. Important learnings here: I am not as accurate as I think I am and I do not know as much about correct capitalisation and presentation as I thought I did. Julia was thorough and I am grateful to her. She helped ensure the professional appearance of the book.
  3. Looking professional is important in such a small-scale project. I searched for someone to design a cover and found Simon Avery of Idobookcovers. I was attracted by the designs on his website, and by his deign process. I had to provide information about my book, Simon did four preliminary designs, I considered these and asked around – my friends, family and writing group all gave their opinions. Finally I asked for some variations to one of the original designs and Simon obliged. It was not cheap, in fact it was the most expensive aspect of the whole thing. But a cover carries so much about the book, its tone, its genre, it is worth getting it right.
  4. Each copy of the book cost more than £10 to produce. As I was not primarily concerned with making a living I decided on a lower cover price.Decisions about theprint run have been guesswork based on my Christmas present list and the other possible destinations for copies. I settled on 100 at £8.99 each.
  5. Another writer I know had used a local printer, Nick Walker of Kingsbridge, and the people there were very patient and helpful as I got my copy ready for print. I found it hard to set up the pages correctly, and the pagination I really wanted eluded me to the end. I hope to improve on that aspect of publishing next time. The printing process seemed like magic: it would take my imaginary book and turn it into a concrete thing. I have chosen not to produce an ebook, partly because I don’t read them myself, but mostly because what I wanted from this process was to hold a book of my fiction in my hand.
  6. I haven’t yet entered the world of promotion, publicity and marketing. That’s my next step.

I fully expect not to recoup my costs, and although it is a business I expect it to remain small, and the losses to be manageable.

And who knows where this will take me? I may decide to publish my novel, books by writers and poets I know, or even launch out and take submissions. But not yet. I’m starting small. Please don’t inundate me with manuscript submissions.

The Conchie Road

I recently posted an article on this blog called The Story of The Conchie Road. It described the writing of a short story called The Conchie Road, which took me to local history meetings, and to the Dartmoor Prison Museum at Princetown, and to reading aloud to cows in the rain on Dartmoor. You can read the story in Better Fetch A Chair.

And if you want to obtain a copy for the reduced price of £5 (p&p included) you can either email me (lodgecm@gmail.com) or DM me on twitter @lodge_c and I will send you details.

Better Fetch A Chair  by Caroline Lodge, published by Bookword in 2018. 142pp. Cover price is £8.99 but available for £5.

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Please note that in future I shall be posting every five days (instead of four) to give myself a little more time for my other bookish projects. I hope you’ll continue to enjoy the mixture of posts.

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Filed under Books, Publishing our book, Reading, Reviews, short stories

The Story of the Conchie Road

In May 2017 I was walking on Dartmoor. I was on a clear track into Princetown from the east, with views of the prison and the tv mast.

I had walked across the open moor, through the remains of Whiteworks, an old tin mine, across Foxton Mire – a quaker to use the phrase adopted by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. I was promised a cist called the Crock of Gold. And then I checked the directions for the walk

Turn left … and climb gently, heading straight for the TV mast in the distance. The path later gives way to a better-surfaced gritty track, the result of the hard labour of conscientious objectors during the First World War; the war ended before the track could be completed. … [From Dartmoor Walks, Pathfinder Guide, walk 24).

My interest was immediately aroused. What were conscientious objectors doing on Dartmoor and why were they building unfinished roads? I began my researches. This post is the history of a short story and how that walk in May 2017 took me and my writing to places I would never have predicted.

The Conchie Road or the Road to Nowhere

My researches turned up information about COs (conscientious objectors) and about the project to build the road. About 1000 COs were housed in Dartmoor Prison buildings, renamed Princetown Work Centre after conscription was introduced in 1916. Men who refused to join the armed forces faced a tribunal and some were granted exemptions. They had religious or political objections. The COs on Dartmoor were required to do work ‘of national importance’. There was a plan to develop the Prince of Wales’s land on Dartmoor, and the road was intended to service these farms.

The land was very poor, even when drained by the COs, and even today is very thin. It was not a project with much prospect of success and the road was nicknamed ’the road to nowhere’.

Sometimes ideas are presented to writers. The nickname of the road to nowhere nicely stood for the experience of COs in 1916 through to the years after the war. The metaphorical Conchie Road was a hard one and I wrote a short story about Sam Skelton, a political CO, who was sent to Dartmoor, who worked on the road, and who found very little respect after the war. I called it The Conchie Road.

Devon Remembers Heritage Project

I recently wrote a post about the Devon Remembers Heritage Project. It involved ordinary people (that is, not historians) and supported about 30 research projects into how the war affected life in Devon 1914-18. One of these concerned COs from Devon. I went to a presentation about the research into the men who refused to fight. Many, many of them were Friends, and the Exeter Meeting hosted the event. You can find the previous post Devon Voices from WW1 here.

Many of the Quaker COs joined the ambulance brigades and served at the front; others refused to support the war in any way and were sent to work camps, including Princetown.

I offered my story to the Heritage Project and it is included in the archives.

Article in Devon Life

I found that many local people knew nothing about the road, or about the presence of COs on Dartmoor during the First World War. I was keen to share the outcomes of my research and the pleasure of the walk so I submitted an article to Devon Life. It was published in April 2018 under the title Pacifists’ Pathway. It presented the history of the road and the COs and recommended walkers to try it out. I took pictures of the road in December to accompany the article, having persuaded my sister to join me on a very slushy walk.

The Plaque for The Conchie Road

On November 3rdthis year I attended the ceremony honouring the COs in Princetown. We began with a vigil outside the Dartmoor Information Centre, and then walked to the point on the Conchie Road where a plaque was unveiled. It was organised by Friends. It was also attended by Simon Dell, historian of Dartmoor, who wrote the book The Dartmoor Conchies.

As we stood in silence during the vigil in Princetown a long line of soldiers, weighed down with equipment, bearing arms, faces blackened, filed past the circle of silence. It seemed very inappropriate.

At the plaque it was drizzling, cows had assembled under the trees, and we could see walkers on the path. I had been asked to read some of my story. It was a strange experience to read the passage where Sam and his mates are sent to build the road, grumbling at the waste of their energies and to read it in the place it was set, in the rain, with an audience of cows and Friends.

We also heard from the daughter of a CO, also a Friend. Her father had met and fallen in love with his wife in Princetown. He never spoke of his experiences as a CO, she told us.

2018 Exeter Short Story Prize

A few days after the ceremony I was thrilled and very proud to discover that my story had been shortlisted for the 2018 Exeter Short Story Prize.

The Dartmoor Conchies (Dartmoor Prison’s Conscientious Objectors of The Great War) by Simon Dell, published in 2017 by the Dartmoor Company.

Update May 2019

You can read the story in Better Fetch A Chair,  the collection of my short stories published in December 2018.

And if you want to obtain a copy for the special reduced price of £5 (p&p included) you can either email me (lodgecm@gmail.com) or DM me on twitter @lodge_c and I will send you details.

Better Fetch A Chair  by Caroline Lodge, published by Bookword in 2018. 142pp. Cover price is £8.99 but available for £5.

If you haven’t yet please re-subscribed to this blog to receive email notifications of future posts. Enter your email address in the box. Recent difficulties with this blog resulted in the loss of my previous database.

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Filed under Books, Reading, Writing, Writing and Walking