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Cat Brushing by Jane Campbell

Old People are not pets.’ I wish I could remember where I came across this truth recently. I like a book that depicts older people, especially older women, as real humans, with the full range of emotions and experiences. Such books are to be treasured but can be hard to find.

This problem is explored in an article in the most recent edition of Mslexia (Dec/Jan/Feb 2022/3) by Debbie Taylor called The Time of our Lives. The article looked at myths about ageing authors, and also about the characters that older women want to read about. The article referred to the ten top novels featuring older women on Bookword and listed this blog as a resource for interested readers. There is a great deal to think about in the article. 

This is the 61st post in the series of older women in fiction which I promote to make older women in fiction more visible. You can find the link at the end of the post to the complete list of 100+ suggested books in the series with links to those I have reviewed on Bookword Blog.

Cat Brushing

I find it hard to review collections of short stories. The quality and interest will be variable, and what I have enjoyed may not please others. What is pleasing in this collection is that every story is about an older woman. They do not always act wisely, do not always triumph. But they are written as real people, not a different species, and not as curiosities or pets. 

The title story is told in the first person, as the unnamed old woman grooms her beautiful Siamese cat, noting the pleasure the cat receives. 

And seeing her respond like this to the smooth strokes I could see myself in bed with one of my lovers, and my own arching and offering, and wondered, when I had finished with the brushing, whether she felt as I had when it was over, not just brushed but glad, even grateful to have been brushed. In other words, was the moment only with her, or was there a reflective pleasure as well? (45-6)

It is gradually revealed that the narrator and the cat are living in Bermuda with her son and daughter-in-law. She regrets the passing of her sensual experiences, and the likelihood that her son and daughter-in-law will want to get rid of the cat because they are having a baby. Giving up pleasure is hard.

I relished the first story in the collection – Susan and Miffy. It starts with a challenge:

The lust of an old man is disgusting but the lust of an old woman is worse. Everyone knows that. Certainly, Susan knew it. (3)

Susan is in a geriatric ward, and after seeing her struggle to replace a light bulb, she lusts after Miffy a ward assistant. The very boring, beige existence of Susan in her younger days is contrasted vividly with the feelings and relationship of the two women. Susan has been an exemplary wife and mother and rarely felt any desire in her life. Now it consumes her.

And so the stories progress, with the women discovering aspects of themselves in the last stages of their lives. Sometimes they find that they have been hanging on to an idea, an ancient love affair, for too long and the object of their affections is no longer interested. One woman is charmed by a fellow passenger on a train in a chance encounter, and their subsequent lives together become exploitative. Another has devoted her life to the care of her father, and to a relationship with him which feels decidedly unhealthy. And the very satisfying story about a woman who has relished being alone all her life but finds happiness in changing her attitude ends the volume.

I liked the collection for its steady presentation of different women, with a variety of attitudes, histories and futures and facing difficult circumstances late in life, drawing on what they had learned over the years. This is a contrast to some depictions of older women as naïve or having learned nothing from their many experiences. Jane Campbell’s women have no magical powers, no wisdom for younger women.

Cat Brushing by Jane Campbell, published in 2022 by riverrun. 245pp

The Bookword page about the series older women in fiction can be found here

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Filed under Books, Older women in fiction, Reading, Reviews, short stories