Tag Archives: Outline

Outline by Rachel Cusk

I’m in a phase of rereading books, and I’m really enjoying it. There are still lots of new and unread books I want to read, but they can wait. I first read Outline when it was published in 2014, but it was recently recommended to me by a friend who writes and it received more attention when Rachel Cusk added the second and third volumes to the trilogy: Transit and Kudos. The rereading has led me to appreciate the writerly intelligence of this novel even more.

Outline by Rachel Cusk

The novel is described as ten conversations. It is narrated by a writing tutor who flies to Athens to provide some classes for aspiring writers. Just about everyone she meets tells her a story about themselves, either because they meet her – sitting next to her on the plane, or socially for dinner, for example – or because they are students in her class. The narrator’s own story is not explicitly told, but the reader must divine her responses and her situation from what is not said. The ten conversations create her outline.

Most of the stories are presented in reported speech, with occasional direct speech. Most of the people she meets are concerned with the failure of intimacy and the difficulty of coping with change. We are given details about their physique, clothes, how they interact with waiters, the sea, other students. There appears to be little direct engagement by these people with the narrator. When one of the students complains bitterly about her lack of direction in the lessons, or when a man tries to kiss her, her emotional reactions are only relayed to us later. Everything seems to be mediated.

So the outline of the title is what surrounds Faye, but who Faye is she does not tell us. Even her name is only revealed casually towards the end of the ten chapters. We know she is a writer, has a son and needs money and she is trying to borrow more. We get a sense of great sadness and recent loss. Even to achieve that outline we must pay attention to the text, to what is and to what is not said. The novel, then asks, some important questions about what we call identity and the place of telling our story or stories in the forming of our identity for ourselves and for others.

This form is daring, experimental, challenging to the reader. There is little story here, at least in the usual sense of a narrative beginning, middle and end. Yet the attentive reader is rewarded with a view of the world that is moving and intelligent. I plan to read Transit and Kudos, the next parts of the trilogy, over the next few months.

This review by Shoshi Ish Horowicz on Shiny New Books blog in 2018 extols the novel’s writerly value.

Outline by Rachel Cusk, published in 2014 by Faber & Faber. 249pp

Shortlisted for Baileys Prize for Women’s Fiction 2015.

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Baileys Prize for Women’s Fiction Shortlist 2015

BWPFF 2015 logoAnnounced on Monday 13th April 2015, here is the shortlist for the Baileys Prize.

  • Rachel Cusk: Outline
  • Laline Paull: The Bees
  • Kamila Shamsie: A God in Every Stone
  • Ali Smith: How to be Both
  • Anne Tyler: A Spool of Blue Thread
  • Sarah Waters: The Paying Guests

160 How to be bothThe winner will be announced on Wednesday 3rd June.

These books were on the longlist:

  • Lissa Evans: Crooked Heart
  • Patricia Ferguson: Aren’t We Sisters?
  • Xiaolu Guo: I Am China
  • Samantha Harvey: Dear Thief
  • Emma Healey: Elizabeth is Missing
  • Emily St. John Mandel: Station Eleven
  • Grace McCleen: The Offering
  • Sandra Newman: The Country of Ice Cream Star
  • Heather O’Neil: The Girl Who Was Saturday Night
  • Marie Phillips: The Table of Less Valued Knights
  • Rachel Seiffert: The Walk Home
  • Sara Taylor: The Shore
  • Jemma Wayne: After Before
  • PP Wong: The Life of a Banana

151 E missiing cover 3

And here’s the shadow shortlist from The Writes of Women blog:

  • Samantha Harvey    Dear Thief
  • Sandra Newman      Ice Cream Star
  • Ali Smith                    How to be Both
  • Sara Taylor                The Shore
  • Anne Tyler                A Spool of Blue Thread
  • Sarah Waters           The Paying Guests

 

Never mind the winner, here’s lots of lovely reading for us all!

 

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