Tag Archives: Matilda Windsor is Coming Home

Lyrics for the Loved Ones by Anne Goodwin 

Where can you hear the voices of older women? How often do you hear them or read them? I began the series, older women in fiction, on this blog assuming that I would not find many books featuring the lives of older women. I was wrong. Thanks to many readers I have compiled a list that now contains more than 100 titles, with 66 of them linked to reviews on this blog. This is the 66th post in the series.

Anne Goodwin was an early supporter of this series and has also joined in my quest to see if older women writers have been marginalised. And she answered my impertinent questions on the topic. I think her publication list indicates that it is the independent publishers who are leading the way in taking on older women writers.

Please find this list of reviewed and recommended books here. You can make recommendations in the comments box.

Lyrics for the Loved Ones

It was a pleasure to meet Matilda Windsor again in this second novel in which she is the central character. In Matilda Windsor is Coming Home we met her after 50 years of incarceration in Ghyllside Mental Hospital in Cumbria, where she had been sent as a young pregnant and unmarried girl. That story looked at the new policy of Care in the Community, and how it would affect a person who had been institutionalised for so long.

In this new novel she is now a very old lady, living in Scarrowdale care home in West Cumbria. Matty has developed strategies to deal with her long-term care. She understands her circumstances through her own fantasies, imagining herself as a great performer, for example. She is always upbeat as a result of her mother’s voice prompting her inside her head. She gives everyone nicknames, for example, the ‘Loved Ones’ are the other residents, many of whom find her difficult. Olive Oyl is a politically aware former teacher; Oh My Darling Clementine is the nurse who was much loved by Matty but who could no longer work due to Windrush investigations; Bluebell her replacement has blue hair and so forth.

The novel is set at the time of Covid, and its characters are the staff and residents of Scarrowdale and relations of these two groups. There is a great deal of angst to go round. Not only are the questions and challenges raised by Covid for care homes staff and residents explored through the characters, but they also have other issues, as we did. There is the fear of cancer when treatment must be suspended; a mental health worker who sees the additional toll of the pandemic; searching for past histories to help understand one’s life. Some of the characters are affected by the #Black Lives Matter campaign. The toppling of Sir Edward Colston’s statue in Bristol prompts Matty to imagine that she is to blame for slavery, and she feels terrible guilt. An isolated woman tries to manage with very little support.

Responding to the crisis Matty plans to raise money for the Red Cross by reciting 100 poems, one a day up to her 100th birthday, on her You Tube channel, during lockdown. She is helped by Bluebell, who equips many of the residents with ipads with which to connect with the wider world.

The creative mind of the main character is as engaging as it was in Matilda Windsor is Coming Home. A spotlight is also thrown onto the work of the care staff, especially Bluebell, who reminds us of the many care staff who went beyond what was expected of them, and who provided exceptional personal care and opportunities to the people in their care during lockdowns.

Inequalities were exacerbated during Covid, many already existed. It was a difficult time for everyone, but some suffered more than others, as this novel vividly illuminates, with humour and humanity. It also reminds me of the importance of communicating, creativity, honesty and mutual assistance in times of trouble, and at all times. 

Thanks to Anne for providing me with an advance copy of her novel.

Lyrics for the Loved Ones by Anne Goodwin, published by Annecdotal Press in 2023. 333pp

Related Posts

Matilda Windsor is Coming Home by Anne Goodwin (Bookword July 2021)

Let’s have more older women writers (Bookword February 2020)

Is there Discrimination against Older Women Writers? Interview with Anne Goodwin, author of Sugar and Snails. (Bookword December 2015)

Older Women writers – in demand or not? (Bookword April 2023)

The Bookword page about the series older women in fiction can be found here.

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Matilda Windsor is Coming Home by Anne Goodwin

It’s 1989. Matilda Osborne is in Ghyllside Hospital in Cumbria. She has been there for about 50 years. She is being moved to Tuke House, half-way accommodation established to help the residents transfer to semi-independent living as part of the new policy – Care in the Community. Matty, as they call her, is 70 years old. The staff are not sure that she will manage the transition.

This is the 54th in the series of older women in fiction which I promote to make older women in fiction more visible. The author, Anne Goodwin, has also contributed to my posts about older women writers. You can find the links at the end of the post and you can find the complete list of 100+ suggested books in my series with links to the reviews here.

Matilda Windsor is Coming Home

The reader follows Matty’s story from three perspectives. The first is of her half-brother Henry, 57 at the time of the story. He was 7 when Tilly (as he knew her) was sent away by her step-father. Both Tilly and Henry were devastated by the separation. Tilly’s mother, a widow, had married Mr Windsor and Henry was their son. But she died in childbirth, so Tilly had raised Henry. He has spent the years since she left searching for her. 

His job with the council is at risk as he does not see the point of using computers and refuses to be retrained. As he is approaching retirement he is transferred to humiliating positions where this is not an issue, which include organising a party for the local old people and dressing up as a Christmas elf, in a hilarious episode. He has not realised how close he is to his sister when he is enrolled into the local campaign to prevent the inhabitants of Ghyllside being rehoused on his doorstep.

A second perspective from which we see Matty is a social worker’s. Janice is newly qualified and her job at Ghyllside is her first. She is optimistic about the new policy and schemes to get Matty onto the first programme for relocation. She has been charmed by Matty. Waiting in the hall for an interview Janice meets the old lady for the first time.

Janice watched her pluck a jelly baby from the packet, bite off its head, and add its body to the tail of a procession snaking the bench.
Engrossed in the etiquette of a parallel universe, she seemed unaware of Janice, too self-absorbed to shimmy along for her to sit or deposit her bag. Yet the woman raised her gaze. “Did you run away from the circus?”
“Pardon me?” Janice would have been less shocked if the walls had addressed her. And, had she credited the patient with a voice stronger than a whisper, and the will to use it, she’d never imagined her speaking like royalty. (16)

Matty’s own perspective is also gradually revealed. She has spent half a century in institutions. She treats everyone as if they were her guest or her servant at her grand house. Her key nurse is her maid, for example. Any difficulties are explained away by the necessities of war. While Matty appears to be a dotty old woman, we can see that she has developed coping mechanisms. She is frequently overcome by thoughts of ‘the Prince’, who it emerges is her step-father. I imagined the prince of darkness. She has many very attractive qualities: a way of speaking her mind, generosity, hospitality, courtesy and resilience.

There are more than 60 short chapters in this novel, so the stories of Matty, her brother and Janice, bowl along with some amusing episodes and some which are more shocking. The past is a dark continent, and as we understand Matty’s story, we can see the difficulties for Janice and the new policy.

Humour in this novel comes from observing the professionals, the social workers and care staff for example. Or from watching Henry pursuing an adulterous relationship once a week with a hairdresser and she is getting fed up with him. Or seeing Matty cope with her life.

“Thank you, dear, that was delicious.”
Au contraire, the food is barely palatable but that is no fault of the maid, or the cook, given the challenges of producing an appetising menu in wartime. Indeed, it would be perverse to eat cordon bleu when the men suffer so dreadfully at the front. Besides, flattering the staff pays dividends. If theyare happy, so are the guests.
“Could you manage some jam roly-poly and custard?” (96)

As readers we are asked to consider the challenges of rolling out the policy of care in the community, including reactions to it. NIMBYism is a feature. We can also see how in the past attitudes to unwelcome behaviour, especially pregnancy of unmarried women, involved removal from the community. At the end of the 20thcentury racism and homophobia work their evil. 

And through these events we can see some of the damage done by long-term institutionalisation. They take your name. They take your past They take your history. They take control of your accommodation and movement. They treat you like a child yet you are not safe from sexual predation. Exploitation of women has a very long history, of course.

Matilda Windsor is Coming Home by Anne Goodwin, published in 2021 by Inspired Quill. 405pp

Related posts

Is there Discrimination against Older Women Writers? December 2015

Let’s have more older women writers  February 2020

Why we need more Older Characters in Fiction by Anne Goodwin. Her recent blog post on Inspired Quill Blog

At the Jerusalem by Paul Bailey

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