Tag Archives: Inez Holden

There’s No Story There by Inez Holden

Are some people not interesting enough to write about? Perhaps in the 1940s working people were not thought to have interesting lives. Certainly many of the best known wartime novels concern people of the middle class: Mrs Minever and Mollie Panter-Downes for example. Inez Holden took a more democratic view, and her short novels, Night Shift (1941) and There’s No Story There (1944), are a direct challenge to that attitude. There’s No Story There is set in a huge munitions factory, somewhere in the north. It focuses on the people, the 30,000 people who work in Statevale. 

The focus is not so much on a story but on the individuals who live and work in Statevale. There is a murder and an industrial accident, a visit by a famous person, a snowstorm, a short reunion of a couple divided by the war and there is the relentless and very dangerous work. 

There’s No Story There was first published in 1944 and has been reissued in a handsome edition by Handheld Press in March 2021. My thanks to Handheld Press for my copy. 

There’s No Story There

The novel begins with a new shift arriving at the factory. Some workers live or are billeted locally, most live in the hostels provided. They arrive in buses and must prepare thoroughly for work by going through a series of checks and clothing changes.

The cloud of humanity approached the first factory gates and broke up into individuals. (3)

We start then with individuals. And to make the point that we are not looking at an amorphous crowd, Inez Holden, continues

They walked in single file. People from the Potteries, volunteers of the first war year; new conscripts, old and young; housewives from the villages; women from the towns; from Scotland and Ireland; men just discharged from the Army and invalids of long-time unemployment; ex-miners, greengrocers, builders, bakers, men from the south, from the north, middle-aged men wounded in the last war, young men soon to be called up and old casual labourers. The sons of preachers; the daughters of dockers, the children of crofters. (3) 

And she begins to name some of them: Old Charlie, Gluckstein, Jameson, Julian, Linnet, Geoffrey Doran and so on.

They move through the inspection gate, leave their possessions in the contraband hut, change their clothes in the shifting house, and emerge wearing a white suit with a white conical hat and white soft sneaker shoes. After a cup of tea in the canteen they apply protective white cream and powder to their faces. They emerge like figures in a sci-fi movie into the Danger Area, set out like a town, with street signs, a train and bus service and very few people visible, for the workshops are submerged.

Having left the ordinary trappings of human appearance behind them, the reader enters this alien world alongside the workers as they begin their shifts. For example Julian began the war in a ship, but it was torpedoed and he now suffers from mutism. But his inner voice is never quiet, ‘speaking in silence’, as he carefully moves materials between the sheds. Linnet is thinking about her husband Willie, who is due some leave. Others are planning for the King’s visit. At the end of the shift some workers go to the pub, others return to their quarters and entertain themselves, play chess or cards, or write letters.

One night it begins to snow and the shift up at the factory is snowed in. People take on new roles, providing tea, shifting snow from the railway, organising entertainment. Being snowed in provided one of the few moments when the workers openly talk about what the factory is producing.

‘It was funny to-night in the canteen when Maggie and Miss Robinson were serving tea together.  […] Funny wasn’t it , all those people singing and working together – the Blue shift and the White, Labour Officers, operatives, canteen workers and all. They were all laughing and seemed happy. Funny when you think what we are all here for, and how we’re only making things to kill people. It don’t seem right do it?’ (139)

More stories are told: we learn how the boiler man lost his hand; of the paranoia Gluckstein has of discrimination against Jews; of the disappointing visit by Linnet’s husband, a stranger for the war has taken the couple in such different directions; of the secret held close by the self-important security chief, which is known by everyone; the abuse of power by the gate policeman and the accident that kills one of the workers.

Holden is challenging the idea that the working people have nothing interesting about them. On the contrary they are individuals, willing, resourceful and exploited. The title appears on the final page. A former journalist is asked why she doesn’t write about Statevale. ‘There’s no story there,’ she replies. We, who have read thirteen chapters, know otherwise.

What makes this novel so successful is Inez Holden’s powers of observation, her ability to write believable dialogue and her ability to use all the senses in describing Statevale. 

I really enjoyed this volume. Although there is no strong narrative, there is plenty to consider, and there is a bonus of three short stories included in this volume. The longest, Musical Chairman, makes the point that real life can be more absorbing than the movies. 

The introduction by Lucy Scholes is very helpful in placing Inez Holden in the context of the literary world of 1920-50. More detail, especially of Inez Holden’s life and milieu can be found in a Paris Review article, also written by Lucy Scholes. 

Night Shift was reviewed on this blog along with two other books about the Second World War, in November 2019.

There’s No Story There: wartime writing, 1944-45 by Inez Holden, first published in 1944 and reissued byHandheld Press in March 2021. 231pp

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Themed review: novels from the Home Front in WW2

One might expect wartime fiction to provide comfort, escapism, even propaganda. Many no doubt did. However the four novels featured here written and set in Britain during the war also took the opportunity to reveal something new and different about the human condition and to record some of their bizarre and unusual experiences. 

Setting novels on the Home Front of the Second World War

Setting novels in wartime brings the writer many opportunities. Unexpected locations, events, characters and relationships arise in wartime. Motives can be unclear. Characters, especially heroines and heroes, are often required to find resources within themselves that they did not know they had. 

For me, the ultimate war novel will probably always be Catch-22 by Joseph Heller. The protagonists face some dreadful and nonsensical situations, meet officers who are completely out of their depth, and try to survive however they can. Much of the novel points up the craziness of the war. It was set on a Mediterranean island in the Second World War, but not published until 1961. 

In the Heat of the Day by Elizabeth Bowen

1st Edition

This novel is a thriller, set in war-time London, centred on the Regents Park area. Stella is approached by the mysterious and rather malevolent Harrison at an open air concert. He appears to know things about her lover Robert, questioning his commitment to the war effort. Allegiances to people and countries of birth are under suspicion. The description of an air raid is vivid and exciting. And this passage about the presence of the dead in London is moving.

Most of all the dead, from mortuaries, from under cataracts of rubble, made their anonymous presence – not as today’s dead but as yesterday’s living – felt through London. Uncounted, they continued to move in shoals through the city day, pervading everything to be seen or heard or felt with their torn-off senses, drawing on this tomorrow they had expected – for death cannot be so sudden as all that. Absent from the routine which had been life, they stamped upon that routine their absence – not knowing who the dead were you could not know which might be the staircase somebody for the first time was not mounting this morning, or at which street corner the newsvendor missed a face, or which trains and buses in the homegoing rush were this evening lighter by one passenger. (p91-2)

Elizabeth Bowen wrote most of the novel during the war, but apparently found it hard to complete and it was not published until 1948.

In the Heat of the Day by Elizabeth Bowen (1948). You can find the full post here.

A Footman for the Peacock by Rachel Ferguson

This novel considers a formerly wealthy landed family confronting the changes of the 20th century. The story includes their energetic efforts to resist the advancing demands of the war, for example, to take in evacuees. And is it possible that the peacock is signalling to enemy aircraft?

It is both a social commentary and a thriller set against the background of the first months of the war.

A Footman for the Peacock by Rachel Ferguson (1940) reissued by Furrowed Middlebrow Books (2016). My comments on this novel on Bookword can be found here.

Night Shift by Inez Holden 

Night Shift is a novella first published in 1941. The episodes are framed as six night shifts in a factory in East London during the Blitz. The workers, mostly women, make surveillance cameras for aircraft. There is little story, but the people who work, supervise, or relax in the canteen reveal their separate lives as they work together. Each person is given a name or nickname, and they interact in a way that demonstrates a sense of community, but they are not connected to their important work. They are strangely isolated on their night shifts. The novella strongly conveys the daily interactions of Londoners, the inconveniences of Blitz damage, the noise, the concerns about women’s wages and the sense of so many individuals being involved in these events.

Reading it one felt it was a record of a strange and unusual time. The novella has been republished with Inez Holden’s wartime diaries so in a sense that impression is justified.

Blitz Writing: Night Shift & It was Different at the Time by Inez Holden (1941/5), published by Handheld Press 2019. The second half of this book is extracts from her diaries. Thanks to Heavenali and JacquiWine’s Journal for drawing my attention to this volume.

Mrs Miniver by Jan Struther

It is a bit of a stretch to call this a wartime novel. To begin with although the characters are fictional it is more a collection of articles from The Times about everyday middle class life in pre-war Britain. And secondly it hardly features the war. But it has the reputation of a wartime novel largely because of the famous film which can be seen as propaganda. The character of Mrs Miniver was considered very successful and Churchill claimed it contributed to the entry of the USA into the war.

There is a comforting feeling about Mrs Miniver despite the looming violence. Perhaps the pieces were gathered together and published as war began to remind people of what could be lost.

Mrs Miniver by Jan Struther was published in 1939 and by Virago (1989). My thoughts about it on Bookword can be found here

And you might be interested in The Love-Charm of Bombs: Restless Lives in the Second World War by Lara Feigel (2013), published by Bloomsbury. This book explores the varied effects of war upon the following writers: Elizabeth Bowen, Rose Macaulay, Hilde Spiel, Henry Yorke (Green) and Graham Greene.

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