Tag Archives: Coronavirus

Writing in the time of Covid

Many people have reported finding it challenging to write in the time of the pandemic. I know this from my writing group, from twitter and from my own experience. Why this has been so is not entirely clear to me, but I have an idea about it.

Here are some writing achievements that I have managed during the pandemic.

136 posts on Bookword Blog

I have blogged consistently every 5 days (except over Christmas in 2021). On 20th March 2020 I blogged about sleep in fiction and136 posts later I am blogging about writing. Ten days ago, I blogged about books that help me when I can’t sleep. I suspect that not sleeping and not writing during the pandemic are connected.

So, I have been reading a great deal in order to provide material for these posts. I checked on my reading log and find that I have read 150 books since March 25th 2020. And yes, I do keep records of all this.

Co-editing More Gallimaufry 

One of my two greatest writing-related achievement has been as a member of the team co-editing our writing group’s anthology, More Gallimaufry. Technically I am the publisher of this fine volume. Some of the work involved was tedious, and some quite tricky, but overall it was an honour to be involved in the production of such a fine volume. Twenty-one writers from our group provided poems, short stories and memoirs for our project. Three of our writers, who are also visual artists, provided the cover and the internal illustrations. It has been selling well since I posted about it in mid-November. 

Writing a novel with my grandson

In December my grandson, aged 10, tested positive for Covid. We live in the same village so normally if he is ill and off school I am involved in his care. But he had to isolate, so I had to find some other ways of helping him endure the ten days in which he was restricted.

My daughter sent me a photograph of Josh with our dog. The dog is a beautiful cocker spaniel called Lupin and is devoted to all family members. The photo was taken on the first day of Josh’s isolation, and they both look a bit fed up with being indoors. The picture of the two of them sparked an idea. I found an empty notebook, printed the picture, glued it onto the cover and wrote chapter one of a story about a glum boy and his dog who had super-powers. I invited Josh to write the next section.

A couple of days later Josh rang me, read the continuation of the story that he had written, and which he had printed out and stuck into our book. Soon after I collected the notebook and completed chapter 3, and so it went on until Josh was freed from isolation and we had seven chapters in our book. Two chapters were written together during the Christmas holidays. After a walk with the dog during which we discussed some ideas, we went back to my house and completed the story. We gave it a title: Josh and Lupin’s Amazing Adventure. We made the rest of the family listen to our reading.

For me, this was the second of the two productive writing activities since the pandemic began. I especially enjoyed the creativity of the final two sessions when Josh and I wrote together. We bounced ideas of each other – a pitchfork, baddies who couldn’t swim, a host of dogs. Then we developed them and found amusing ways to weave them into our story. And, of course, we left the ending open for more adventures, which will be necessary if I have to isolate. [Sometimes I say when I have to isolate.]

LATE Update: Josh has Covid again, so it is possible there will be further adventures.

Writing in a time of Covid

Once again, I notice that writing together, collaborative projects are often the most enjoyable, and the most creative. These have been restricted as we have endured social distances over the last 22 months.

From this observation I learn that as we reclaim more flexibility, more opportunities, I can pursue more collaborative possibilities to continue to develop as a writer. 

I may be able to finish that short story about Phyllis with a bit of help. And perhaps even get someone to help me retrieve that novel from its drawer. And I haven’t mentioned the poems, a small number of poems, that I have written during this time. Perhaps there is more to explore there too? 

Related posts

More Gallimaufry: another achievement for the writing group (November 2021)

What I did during Lockdown – my Covid diary (June 2020)

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Filed under Books, Books for children, Learning, Publishing our book, Writing

Missing my writing group

I miss my writing group. We have not met in person since March, six months ago. The Coronavirus pandemic has postponed or cancelled some of the good things planned for this year, including an away day to work together on writing.

The Writing Group

I have been in this writing group since it started 7 years ago. The librarian called together some local writers and we formed our group. We have retained the library connection because we want people to be able to join in, as freely as they visit a library. It’s open to all. We only have one rule: don’t put yourself or your writing down. (None of this ‘it’s very rough really and I think you’ll hate it,’ or ‘I’m not sure about this, I’m not as experienced as the rest of you,’ and so on. It’s surprising how hard it is to wean people off this way of introducing their writing.)

Over the years we have achieved some rewarding things. We produced an anthology of our writing called Gallimaufry. We sold it to the public for £5 a copy, using the marketing ploy that it was an excellent Christmas present. We put our oldest and whitest haired members to the front and stood in the library entrance and sold them. 

It was a good experience. We learned a fair bit about producing a book and although it did not raise any funds for the group we were proud of our efforts.

Then there was the evening when brave members performed their work. We celebrated our 4th birthday with a brilliant bookish cake. We were not quite brave enough to open this to the public, but the event was attended by tolerant and appreciative friends and relations. 

Emboldened by all this, and wanting to try new aspects of sharing our work in the community, we decided to host a one day writing festival. None of us had realised what a step up that would be. It tested our organisational skills and rather got in the way of writing for the committee members. 

But in September 2019 we hosted about 100 local people to attend 12 workshops, some readings, a school’s writing display, a sale of books, and a poetry slam. It was a great success 

The feedback was positive. No we wouldn’t be doing this annually. We might repeat some of the activities. We needed to recover. We got ourselves sorted to use our funds for various activities, all aimed to support writing by people in the community and –

Covid-19 locked us down.

Writing in a pandemic

It’s been hard, writing in this pandemic, or rather not writing. Like many people I wrote a lockdown diary. I stopped after 4 months because I felt that my life was being prescribed by the virus. I began to feel that I should make my life be about more than Covid-19, that I would take account of the pandemic of course, but not be more defined by it than necessary. 

I have continued with my Morning Pages. I follow a modified version of the recommendation in The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron. I start every day with Morning Pages. It helps me reflect on my writing and my reading and other activities important for my mental health. 

And I have continued to post on this blog every 5 days. Bookword was launched in December 2012, and I have since posted 613 times. Most of those posts are about books, but a fair number are about writing and publishing. I have no plans to stop soon.

Recently I felt frustrated by my lack of writing. I stopped wondering why I wasn’t getting on with my short story. They always take me a long time, but this one was largely conceived in November 2019. I have written perhaps two thousand words, some of it very poor and written just to get something down. So I decided that I would write 500 words a day. That’s roughly two handwritten sides of A4. I have been doing that since the beginning of September and enjoyed it. Some of it is memoir. Some of it is comment on what’s happening. Some is more like an exercise, a description or a response to a prompt.

And I have decided to take advantage of some on-line writing courses. I love writing courses, although I did feel at one point that I was a course junky and that attending courses was replacing or displacing my writing activities.

And in the last two or three months the writing group has been meeting on zoom. Or rather a few of us have been meeting on zoom. Usually one of us volunteers to offer a prompt and then we write together and read the results of our efforts. There is always laughter and always lots of praise and encouragement. We were just thinking that we might meet in person in a suitably distanced way when the rule about meeting in groups of six as a maximum was introduced. 

We are at the point of thinking about some variations in the way we use the zoom facility to share our work on the chat or screen share facility, using the audio and visual possibilities and so on.

So now I know

So now I know that my writing group, in person, round a table, with people who I know only as writers (often nothing more about them, their families, jobs, where they live etc etc) is important for my writing and that I will want us to operate again as we did when this is over.

What I like about the group is the stimulus, the laughter, the audience, the critique and above all the community.

Tell us what do you need from a writing group?

Related posts

Gallimaufry or why my writing group is cock-o-hoop (January 2016)

A Writing Festival – why would you organise one?

A Birthday for Our Writing Group

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