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Consider the Lilies by Iain Crichton Smith

It is unusual is to find a novel of historical fiction that features an older woman. And not many books in this series about older women have been written by men. Iain Crichton Smith locates this old woman at the start of the 18th century at the time of the Highland clearances in Scotland. Why did the author explore the experiences of this old woman in this context?

Many readers of the blog will know that I am championing fiction containing older women. This will be the 45th in the series. This novel was suggested to me in August when I was guest blogger on Global Literatures, looking at older women around the world. Thanks to that reader and I’m sorry I did not keep a record of who recommended what.

Consider the Lilies

It is the time of the Highlands Clearances in the early 1800s. An old woman, Mrs Scott, is visited by the agent of the Duke. Patrick Sellar tells her that the Duke will be putting her out of her house. The land is to be used for sheep.

Mrs Scott is over 70, a widow. She lives on her own, looked after by the village, and a staunch church-goer. She has lived in the house all her life. She has no family to turn to as her son emigrated to Canada. What is she to do? 

She seeks advice from the village elder, who has nothing to offer. And then from the minister, who disgusts her by lying and counselling compliance with the Duke. On her return from her visit to the Manse she falls into a stream and is rescued by a radical family who care for her until she recovers. Mrs Scott revises her opinions of this family. Like all the villagers, the Macleods are also to lose their homes. The villagers will face the threat together.

Mrs Scott

Mrs Scott is an independent woman, with a great deal of pride. She believes in behaving correctly, according to the dictates of the church. In the first chapter, when she receives Patrick Sellar with highlander’s courtesy, it is clear that the old ways will not protect her against the threat this uncouth man presents. He sees her as stupid when she is being respectful.

Her life is governed by her strict adherence to religion, the Old Testament kind. In the past, we learn, this belief led her to care for her mother, suffering from dementia, without revealing the terrible demands to her neighbours. It also meant that her own son left for Canada. And although the villagers provide some help, this crisis reveals that she has no one to advise her. She is a woman of some resolution however and does not wait patiently for her fate.

She consults the church elder, who turns out to be more concerned for his own future and is weak in the face of this crisis. And she approaches the minister, a man to whom she has never before spoken. He lies to her, blames the sins of the villagers for this misfortune and recommends compliance with Patrick Sellar’s order.

It is this betrayal by the church that provides the turning point for Mrs Scott. She stumbles away from the Manse, but falls into a stream on the way home and is rescued and cared for by another villager, Donald MacLeod. Until this moment he has been everything she stands against, including an atheist. But she comes to see that he and his family are more caring than those to whom she turned.

She refuses to betray the Macleods to Patrick Sellar when he returns and we see that she has learned the value of community, care for your neighbours, has moved to a different set of values and beliefs.

Writing the novel Consider the Lilies

The demographic trends, probably as a result of better public health and improved medical science, means that we are living longer today. It was rare for people to reach their 80s in the past. Iain Crichton Smith had a reason for choosing a very old woman to be the protagonist of this novel. Using one of the weakest villagers emphasises the inhumane actions of the landlord and his agent.

The novel strongly conveys the cruelties of the Highland Clearances, and was very much in tune with social history at the time it was written, in the 1960s. The landowners and the church together are the antagonists in this novel. Iain Crichton Smith (1928 – 1998) was brought up on the Isle of Lewis and spoke and wrote in Gaelic as well as English. He was critical of dogma and the abuse of authority, as revealed in this novel.

And the title? It is from the New Testament and suggests that Mrs Scott is as significant as any other person. But it also suggests that appearances can deceive and its use questions whether God will provide. 

Consider the lilies how they grow: they toil not, they spin not; and yet I say unto you, that Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. If then God so clothe the grass, which is to day in the field, and tomorrow is cast into the oven; how much more will he clothe you, O ye of little faith? And seek not ye what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink, neither be ye of doubtful mind. For all these things do the nations of the world seek after: and your Father knoweth that ye have need of these things. But rather seek ye the kingdom of God; and all these things shall be added unto you. (Matthew 6:28-31)

The author mixed fact with fiction. The clearances took place and there was an agent called Patrick Sellar who went on to make a good living out of the farms that replaced the villages. He worked for the Duke of Sutherland’s estates. He was later accused of causing the death of an old woman in an arson attack on her cottage. Of course he was acquitted. 

Consider the Lilies by Iain Crichton Smith, 1968. I read the edition published by Phoenix in 2001. 144pp

Here are some recent additions to the Older Women in Fiction series:

The Little Old Lady by Catharina Ingleman-Sundberg

The Boston Girl by Anita Diamant

Meet Me at the Museum  by Anne Youngson

Drive Your Plow over the Dead Bones by Olga Tokarczuk

See also a comprehensive list including many recent recommendations by readers, on the page called About the Older Women in Fiction Series.

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