Tag Archives: bookmarks

Pre-loved books, really?

What a terrible euphemism is ‘pre-loved’. You can find it attached to clothes, and furniture and handbags and, of all things, books. They are SECOND-HAND people, second-hand, not necessarily pre-loved. Many of us bookish people do not give away books that we love.

I’ve recently had cause to think about second-hand books a great deal. I know that many bookish bloggers indulge themselves in second-hand bookstores. I am among them. But I had a problem with second-hand books, or rather seven problems.

Second-hand book sale

To raise some funds for our writing group we recently held a small event for families in the hall next to the library, hoping to catch some passing trade from Saturday morning book borrowers. I volunteered to collect and sell second-hand books.

I have done this before, in aid of Rwandan teacher education. The funds raised were to buy some textbooks for the Ministry Library so that two of our students from Rwanda could help improve the education system as the country emerged from the horrors of its recent past. They were studying Educational Assessment at the Institute of Education, University of London (as it was then). They had scarcely enough funds to support their studies let alone provide stock for teachers back home. On that occasion we encouraged our staff and students to donate books they no longer needed and to buy those that interested them. It worked well. I myself bought a huge and much used French-English dictionary. The students bought the textbooks they needed. We did it twice.

I lay awake, the night before the writing group book sale, worried that we wouldn’t have enough books to sell. I needn’t have wasted any time tossing and turning. Many members of the group brought in books for the stall. Sadly few of them wanted to buy any. And the attendance at the event was poor. Having brought two bags of books myself, I found myself having to take away seven, count them, SEVEN bags for life, of unsold books. We did make some money on the event.

I was left with all those bags of books to dispose of in the local second-hand and charity shops, and it took me two months. At least there were no copies of Fifty Shades of Grey or of The Da Vinci Code. It seems that no one wants these best sellers. They may have sold in their millions but they are also the most disposed of books (see my post on the subject of unwanted and abandoned books here).

The allure of the second-hand book

I love rootling around the shelves of passed-on books. There is always the chance of finding a treasure, by which I mean a book you always wanted to read but you didn’t know it. Here are four finds that I would describe like that:

  • The Soul of Kindness by Elizabeth Taylor
  • The House in Paris and Friends and Relations by Elizabeth Bowen
  • Elizabeth and her German Garden by Elizabeth von Arnim

And I am always on the lookout for Virago editions in the old green covers, interesting both inside and for the covers. The paintings used on those books were an education. The contents introduced me to some previously neglected authors, mostly women.

And I keep an eye out for old orange penguin books. These are not hard to find, but I use the criteria that I must want to read the book if I am to buy it, or that I have enjoyed reading it and no longer have a copy. I will admit to having three copies of A High Wind in Jamaica by Richard Hughes and some other multiple copies (such as A Room of One’s Own), which I sometimes think I should try to put back into circulation.

Part of the allure of the second-hand book is imagining the possible pleasure of the previous reader/s. Occasionally one finds markings on the text, or inscriptions inside the cover. Even more rarely one finds things inside. I wrote a post about marking the page once, (here’s the link) and before it was even published on the blog I had found a lacy bookmark in a used book.

The mother of a friend of mine would not have liked the idea of previous readers. She baked library books to disinfect them so afraid was she of germs being passed on. I have met people who don’t like the idea of second-hand books for the same reason. ‘Ugh, you don’t know where they have been!’

The downside of second-hand books

While they are cheaper than new books, I wonder if the sale of second hand books doesn’t undercut both the publishing industry and, more importantly, the author who doesn’t get any royalties from the sale. I understand that royalties are paid on the first sale, but perhaps the second-hand copy prevented the reader buying a new copy and the author receiving more royalties. Perhaps the volume of sales is not big enough for this to matter. I don’t know but it worries me. On the other hand, in a charity shop someone is getting something for the sale of the book: part of a cow, some shelter, some assistance. And a book has moved on to a new home and to find new readers.

What are your great second-hand purchases?

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Filed under Books, Elizabeth Bowen, Elizabeth Taylor's novels, Reading, Reviews

Marking the page

A few weeks ago when I picked up my 8 year-old grandson from primary school I noticed he had a plaster on his knee. ‘What happened there?’ I asked. ‘I found a plaster in a reading book and I put it on because I needed one.’

Elastoplast! Of course, the ideal bookmark. So what else do people find in books to mark their page, I wondered.

 

From my internet research

Here’s what Margaret Kingsbury found in pre-read books, as a buyer for a used bookstore:

  • Money
  • Rubber bands
  • Toilet paper
  • Handwritten letters
  • Family photographs

You can find her comments in a Book Riot post from earlier this year.

And librarians reported that they found these items:

  • Food
  • Bus and theatre tickets
  • Wine labels
  • Divorce papers
  • Photos
  • Money

These were reported by Claire Fuller, author of Our Endless Numbered Days and Swimming Lessons, writing in Publishers Weekly. The presence of money in both lists suggests we should be leafing through many more pages as we ponder our next read.

But really people, food? That’s worse than turning down the pages. No really, it is.

Bookmarks I have found

I have found no money, no photos and no food in my books. I have found shopping lists and dried flowers – even dried laurel leaves. There are frequent random slips of paper, cut or torn off something larger but insignificant. I find receipts for the books, or for other items purchased. Not very interesting.

I once found a postcard with details of a change of address in a book I had bought at a second hand store. It seemed poignant, the black and white photograph, the stamp with King George VI’s head, and the neat placing of the two addresses: one for the postman and the other for the recipients. There may have been a story there. What happened when Pauline Jones couldn’t find her friend’s new address? Did they loose touch? I put the card back in the book and have never seen it again.

I tend to use post cards to mark my pages. I expect a fair few have gone to the library, or onto Oxfam’s shelves.

I completed a draft of this post, but within a few days I was in the Oxfam Bookshop when I found this bookmark inside a copy of How it All Began by Penelope Lively. It looks a little special, handmade even, and if you recognise it and want it back get in touch with me via the comments.

One of the characters in my novel [yes I’m still revising it] hides a letter from her lover between the pages of Anna Karenina. The working title of the novel is The Uses of Secrecy. One person’s bookmark is another‘s secret.

Persephone Books provide bookmarks when you buy from their stores. They match the endpapers. Full marks to Persephone Books for understanding the importance of the bookmark. This glorious bookmark for The Squire by Enid Bagnold is Magnolia, from a design for cotton and rayon from 1936.

Over to you …

What do you use to mark your page? What have you found in books?

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Photo Credits:

Bookmark Dean Hochman via VisualHunt.com / CC BY

Bank note Neal. via Visualhunt.com / CC BY-NC-SA

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Filed under Books, Libraries, My novel, Reading