Tag Archives: book production

My New Bookish Project

It is with some trepidation that I go public with my new writing project. I am a publisher or rather Bookword is a new publisher. I am very conscious of the idea of vanity publishing. On the other hand I am enthusiastic about the possibilities for citizen publishing on a small scale. If technology makes it possible for more of us to publish, to rely less on the big 5 publishing commercially motivated companies, to spread the idea of independent publishing, then I am happy to give it a go.

And because my novel needs yet another revision it isn’t my first venture. Instead, and in time to give a copy to everyone I know over the age of 12 for Christmas, it’s a collection of 15 of my short stories written over the last 10 years and called Better Fetch A Chair.

Better Fetch A Chair

I published Better Fetch A Chair in early December 2018. The title is an old African saying. And I have taken the name of my blog as the name of the publishing venture Bookword. My main purpose is to have a physical book, containing my fiction, and I do not expect to make money from it. My other purpose is to learn about book production from start to finish. So this is what I did.

Bookword as Publisher

To set up my enterprise I did the following:

  1. ISBNs are useful because an ISBN will ensure that my book will be entered on various databases, including those used by booksellers and libraries. This will guarantee it a better profile. I bought 10 ISBNs from https://www.nielsenisbnstore.com. You can buy one for £89 or ten for £159. As I expect to publish more than one book in due time the choice was obvious. I also learned about making a legal deposit with the British Library.
  2. My collection of short stories needed a proofreader to check them through. I commissioned @Juliaproofreader aka Julia Gibbs to check my stories for accuracy and get them ready for printing. Important learnings here: I am not as accurate as I think I am and I do not know as much about correct capitalisation and presentation as I thought I did. Julia was thorough and I am grateful to her. She helped ensure the professional appearance of the book.
  3. Looking professional is important in such a small-scale project. I searched for someone to design a cover and found Simon Avery of Idobookcovers. I was attracted by the designs on his website, and by his deign process. I had to provide information about my book, Simon did four preliminary designs, I considered these and asked around – my friends, family and writing group all gave their opinions. Finally I asked for some variations to one of the original designs and Simon obliged. It was not cheap, in fact it was the most expensive aspect of the whole thing. But a cover carries so much about the book, its tone, its genre, it is worth getting it right.
  4. Each copy of the book cost more than £10 to produce. As I was not primarily concerned with making a living I decided on a lower cover price.Decisions about theprint run have been guesswork based on my Christmas present list and the other possible destinations for copies. I settled on 100 at £8.99 each.
  5. Another writer I know had used a local printer, Nick Walker of Kingsbridge, and the people there were very patient and helpful as I got my copy ready for print. I found it hard to set up the pages correctly, and the pagination I really wanted eluded me to the end. I hope to improve on that aspect of publishing next time. The printing process seemed like magic: it would take my imaginary book and turn it into a concrete thing. I have chosen not to produce an ebook, partly because I don’t read them myself, but mostly because what I wanted from this process was to hold a book of my fiction in my hand.
  6. I haven’t yet entered the world of promotion, publicity and marketing. That’s my next step.

I fully expect not to recoup my costs, and although it is a business I expect it to remain small, and the losses to be manageable.

And who knows where this will take me? I may decide to publish my novel, books by writers and poets I know, or even launch out and take submissions. But not yet. I’m starting small. Please don’t inundate me with manuscript submissions.

The Conchie Road

I recently posted an article on this blog called The Story of The Conchie Road. It described the writing of a short story called The Conchie Road, which took me to local history meetings, and to the Dartmoor Prison Museum at Princetown, and to reading aloud to cows in the rain on Dartmoor. You can read the story in Better Fetch A Chair.

And if you want to obtain a copy for the reduced price of £5 (p&p included) you can either email me (lodgecm@gmail.com) or DM me on twitter @lodge_c and I will send you details.

Better Fetch A Chair  by Caroline Lodge, published by Bookword in 2018. 142pp. Cover price is £8.99 but available for £5.

To subscribe and receive email notifications of future posts on Bookword please enter your email address in the box.

Please note that in future I shall be posting every five days (instead of four) to give myself a little more time for my other bookish projects. I hope you’ll continue to enjoy the mixture of posts.

12 Comments

Filed under Books, Publishing our book, Reading, Reviews, short stories