Tag Archives: 84 Chariing Cross Road

Letter from New York by Helene Hanff

Readers will be aware of the charming exchange of letters contained in 84 Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff. Two people who never met exchanged letters about books and life, in the post war era. Helene Hanff was in New York and Frank Doel worked at Marks & Co, the bookshop in London which she approached to supply her with the books she wanted. The two generous souls had exchanged letters for many years. After Frank died Helene created and published the book. It was 1970.

84 Charing Cross Road was immediately successful on both sides of the Atlantic largely for its charm and wittiness. Women’s Hour, a weekday programme on the BBC radio, commissioned Helene to produce a 5-minute letter from New York every month for six months. She began in October 1978 and the six months extended to nearly six years, until 1984. These contributions to the BBC have been collected into this lovely edition, published in 2023, Letter from New York.

Letter from New York

The background to all the letters is her studio apartment on East 72nd Street in Manhattan. She describes the community in the building, the friends and dogs who live there, and the surroundings, especially Central Park. She returns again and again to stories about her neighbours, their dogs, their approach to New York weather, and the daily life lived in ‘the last small town in America’.

The community in which she lived was strong, varied, and lively. Her cousin, in her introduction, describes how convivial Helen Hanff was, always entertaining friends and welcoming newcomers. Some of the connections in the building came from the shared use of food storage facilities, especially when it came to Christmas parties.

On Christmas Eve my pies will once more be up in 1-B in Nina’s freezer, and my sweet potato casserole and homemade cranberry sauce will be down at 4-F North, in Richard’s refrigerator. He will bring them up an hour before dinner, when he has to come up anyway to take the turkey out of the oven for me because one year I dropped that. I’m small and the turkey wasn’t. When he comes up to Christmas dinner Richard has to bring along his hot tray and his good carving knife. After dinner he or Arlene’s Mickey will wheel my tea cart full of dinner dishes up the hall, so I can put them in 8-E’s dishwasher, since Alan and Susan go to Susan’s mother’s on Long Island for Christmas. (165)

Spare keys are distributed in a similar way. Such arrangements reflect as well as foster good neighbourliness. Neighbours in summer sit together on the front steps watching life on the pavement and recommend services, shops and occasionally share dogs. If it sounds somewhat idyllic, that’s because she is constantly upbeat, never one to dwell on the difficulties of life, unless it’s finding the right clothes for a wedding.

She takes us around Central Park, and one episode persuaded English listeners to send wildflower seeds for a neglected area. She and her friends frequently attend concerts and services in churches, theatre performances, inside and in the open air, and the many parades and street parties that took place on New York Streets. She gives us some history and information about the geography of New York city and some of its notable inhabitants. 

Being a monthly newsletter, the rhythms of the year, the seasons, the celebrations, the changes in the city are documented for us. We become familiar with her friends, and especially Arlene, who happily passes on clothes to Helene, and has the delightful habit of giving her twelve presents every Christmas. She describes the collection in January 1983:

I don’t remember when Arlene started giving me twelve Christmas presents, one for each of the twelve days of Christmas. She’s been doing it for years. (We fight about this every year. I always lose.) A few are expensive, all twelve are useful, but they always include three or four so far out they have to be explained to me. […]
Number 12 was two bright terry cloth mitts, each the size of a football, the two joined by a length of rope. First you wash your hair. Then you sling the rope around your neck, slip your hands into the enormous mitts and dry your hair with them. (141)

I haven’t visited New York since 1969, but this book made me feel nostalgic. And her cousin Jean Hanff Korelitz reports the same reaction in the introduction: 

These charming pieces bring back the New York of my childhood, the storefronts and fashions, the errands and quirks and tastes and smells of the city I grew up in. (16)

There are two other charming aspects of this book. One is the illustrations by Bruce Eric Kaplan on the covers, the bookmark as well as the chapter headings.

The other is that this is a lovely book in itself: the design, the paper and smart yellow livery of the binding. Well done Manderley Press. It’s another success for an independent small publisher.

Helene Hanff

Helene Hanff

She was born in Philadelphia in 1916 and was largely self-educated. The books she requested from Marks & Co were to feed her habit of self-education. She made her living as a writer. Her apartment block in New York was renamed Charing Cross House in her honour, after her death in 1997.

84 Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff. My thoughts on this earlier book on Bookword blog in August 2018.

Letter from New York by Helene Hanff, first published in 1992 and reissued by Manderley Press in 2023. 176pp 

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Filed under Books, illustrations, Reading, Reviews, Travel with Books, Writing

The Second Year of the Decades Project

Eleven books, chosen from each of the decades from 1900 onwards, all nonfiction, all by women. That’s what the Decades Project has meant in 2018.

Young Woman with book Aleksandr Deineka 1934

The decade’s list

Here are the books I chose for 2018, with dates and links to the posts:

Home and Garden  by Gertrude Jekyll (1900)

My Own Story  by Emmeline Pankhurst (1914)

A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf (1929)

Testament of Youth  by Vera Brittain  (1933)

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank (1947)

French Country Cooking by Elizabeth David (1951)

Silent Spring  by Rachel Carson (1962)

84 Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff (1971)

The March of Folly by Barbara W Tuchman (1984)

Vagina Monologues  by Eve Ensler (1994)

The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion (2005)

The variety

I am very pleased to have found such variety: memoir, cookery, theatre piece, polemic, and history. The choices reflect women’s wide involvement over the century, and also their influence. Some choices have been avowedly domestic, others about big historical events, or dangers. Several have a very personal focus, but all have something to say to us as we leave 2018.

The book I most enjoyed reading …

… was undoubtedly Silent Spring by Rachel Carson (1962). I had heard of it, about its impact upon people’s understanding of the ecology of the world, her warning about the indiscriminate use of pesticides, her fears for the planet. I had not expected it to be so lyrical, and I was truly shocked by the contents.

I had not predicted, for example, such pleasure from reading about soil and worms:

The soil exists in a state of constant change, taking part in cycles that have no beginning and no end. New materials are constantly being contributed as rocks disintegrate, as organic matter decays, and as nitrogen and other gases are brought down from the skies. At the same time other materials are being taken away, borrowed for temporary use by living creatures. Subtle and vastly important chemical changes are constantly in progress, converting elements derived from air and water into forms suitable for use by plants. In all these changes living organisms are active agents. (62)

Silent Spring by Rachel Carson was first published in 1962. I used the Penguin Modern Classic edition. 323pp

The book I reacted least well to …

… was The March of Folly by Barbara W Tuchman. It had made an impact upon me when I had first read it, and I assumed that it would illuminate some of the ridiculousness of the current Brexit crisis. But the arguments seemed a little circular this time around. Nevertheless, the idea that policy-makers do crazy and foolish things still has traction.

The March of Folly: From Troy to Vietnam by Barbara W Tuchman published in 1984. I read Abacus edition published in 1985. 559pp

The books I was most pleased to read …

… were Testament of Youth  by Vera Brittain and 84 Charing Cross Road  by Helene Hanff. They were both rereads, the first a book that had convinced me of the importance of history as told by women. I liked the second because it reveals the deep friendships created through a shared love of books, and by two charming people.

Testament of Youthby Vera Brittain, first published in 1933. I used the edition published by Fontana in 1979. 661pp

84 Charing Cross Roadby Helene Hanff, first published by Andre Deutsch in 1971. I read the paperback edition published by sphere. 230pp

A theme that emerged …

… was of the increased influence of women in a widening range of spheres as the 20thcentury rolled out. The first book is about gardening, but in the second decade Mrs Pankhurst’s account of the suffragette campaign indicated change. Some of the most important nonfiction writing of the century came from women, including Virginia Woolf, Vera Brittain, Anne Frank, Rachel Carson, Joan Didion.

The Decades Project in 2018:

I enjoyed seeking out and reading nonfiction for 2018. The project maintained the wildcard element in my reading and blog. Next year I plan to follow the same pattern, but to read children’s literature and feature a book once a month. I have already anticipated rereading some of my favourites from my own childhood, but also those from my daughter’s and grandsons’. Watch this space.

Suggestions for this new series are always welcome.

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Filed under Books, Feminism, Reading, Reviews, The Decade project