Blaming by Elizabeth Taylor

This is the final review in my series: Elizabeth Taylor’s novels, all 12 of them in more or less chronological order. They were published between 1945 and 1976. Blaming was the final one, written when she was dying of cancer and published in the year following her death. I have been reading one a month, and so I will, in many ways, miss the constant companion of the last year. Except – I have the collected short stories to dip into, and I can always reread her novels. And I know that there is something of a following by enthusiasts, especially of Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont, on this blog. She features in the list of older women in fiction.

89 blaming coverBlaming begins with Amy on holiday with her husband Nick in Istanbul. When he dies of a heart attack, Martha, a young American woman, supports Amy by accompanying her home. Amy resents her debt to Martha and resists the young woman’s friendship. Martha is without much social finesse or awareness and simply proceeds to make Amy her friend. Amy tolerates her for at best Martha helps pass the time in her grief. And being widowed Amy must adapt to altered relationships with her own family, her housekeeper, and with the man who was married to her friend and is her doctor. As with many of her novels there is an ambiguous ending, without too many clues about the heroine’s future happiness with her new partner.

The housekeeper Ernie is an odd creation, but good to read some gender role reversal. The grandchildren are well portrayed. One is from hell and the other precocious. Amy doesn’t really like them. She falls out with her son. This is another reversal for as he grows older he feels able to tell her what to do – about money, her friendship with Martha and her life generally.

All the main characters are lonely. Amy was bored of her life with her husband, although she missed him badly after he died. Martha is an isolate who prefers London to the mid-west, but takes her own life when she cannot manage marriage and when Amy does not welcome her return to London.

I am not sure about the key idea included in the title: blame. Is it a useful part of reflection, considering one’s culpability and experiencing the shame that goes with it, thus enabling corrective or changed behaviour. Blaming by other people always seems to me to be unhelpful, unproductive and often destructive.

89 ET listAt one point in the novel Martha asks Amy what she would do if she knew her life was limited. Amy replies empty her drawers. Do we take it that in Blaming Elizabeth Taylor was in Blaming, somehow, emptying her drawers?

So I have now read them all. The project itself was enjoyable and enabled me to understand how Elizabeth Taylor’s skill developed and expanded, and how her imagination explored lives from so many perspectives, how she gave her characters so many faults and quirks and disabling traits. I especially enjoyed reading A View of the Harbour again, but also A Wreath of Roses for the first time. The characters are beautifully depicted in communities that are recognisable; one a little dispirited seaside town, the other a tight group of women.  I think it will be a while before I revisit the monstrous Angel, or the smug Flora from The Soul of Kindness. You can find my reviews by using the search function or accessing the category Elizabeth Taylor’s novels. This series also brought me to read Nicola Beauman’s biography: The Other Elizabeth Taylor.

89 ET shelfI am considering reading all of Elizabeth Bowen’s books next. In the Heat of the Day is a novel I would recommend to anyone and I have reviewed The Last September on this blog as well. What do you recommend?

 

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2 Comments

Filed under Books, Elizabeth Taylor's novels, Reading, Reviews

2 Responses to Blaming by Elizabeth Taylor

  1. What reading persistence!

  2. Anne

    I have really enjoyed reading Taylor’s novels in your company- and like you I am sorry to have come to the end of them although I know I shall reread many – though not all and this one “Blaming” was not a favourite. I didn’t really like any of the characters and was not drawn into following their fates. I wish the author was better known and I have recommended her to a number of friends so – there- I have done my bit to pass on the delights of her novels.

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