Monthly Archives: February 2022

The Flight of the Maidens by Jane Gardam

My book group decided to read The Flight of the Maidens by Jane Gardam. I was pleased as I very much enjoy her novels, especially the Old Filth trilogy. So too do many others, who voted for the first of the trilogy to be included in the Guardian’s 100 best reads. I like the way she explores lives, especially those of women. She excels at placing them in difficult situations and requiring them to face dilemmas.  I especially enjoy the quirky details that she includes. Sometimes they are relevant to the plot line, and sometimes they provide period or character detail. The death of Old Filth’s wife Betty as she plants tulips and hides evidence of her betrayal, is one of those moments. I had not read The Flight of the Maidens.

The Flight of the Maidens

The novel follows three young women at that exciting moment in their lives when they are about to branch out, in this case all three have won places at university and the novel begins as they all secure the funding that will enable them to take up their places. 

These events occur in the summer of 1946, the war has ended and everywhere there is the sense of emerging from six years of disruption and deprivation. The national mood echoes the mood of the three young women who have spent their school days at war. 

The three girls take different routes over the next three months as they spread their wings (take flight) before meeting up again on the eve of taking their places at university.

Hetty lives with a mother who is suffocating in her attention to her daughter and a father who has never returned from the Somme. Her works as a grave digger but is known locally as something of a philosopher and rather fragile. Mostly to escape her mother, but also to experience a wider world than her Yorkshire village, she takes herself off to the Lake District to spend some weeks reading in preparation for her course. While there, staying in a guesthouse on a farm, Hetty learns a thing or two about herself. Her horizons are broadened when she meets the people of the area: those who work on the land and the aristocrats who seem to be quite mad. One of the aristocrats in the devilishly handsome Rupert, who seems somewhat unavailable but a dreadful flirt. She is rescued from seduction by distressing news from home.

Una is the single daughter of a single mother who has supported them both from the income from operating a not very reliable hairdresser’s in her home. She has had a longstanding uncommunicative relationship with a local boy who leaves school to get a job and works his way up to a career on the railway. Their relationship, up to this point, has been conducted through bike rides at weekends. Now Ray and Una decide to spend a weekend together in a remote hostel. Their plans are disrupted in a most unfortunate way, but their next attempt brings the looked-for intimacy. Una wonders whether university is the way to go.

Lottie has been in England since 1938, brought as an endangered Jewish child from Hamburg on the Kindertransport, and cared for by a Quaker family in Yorkshire. She is severely restricted in her emotional expression and in her interactions. She suddenly disappears to London where she is taken in by a very eccentric older Jewish couple who escaped from Germany with many items of household furnishing. They had been experts in transportation before they fled. After a few weeks of exploring bomb-damaged London, Lottie travels on to California to consider the option of being adopted by an older, rich, American relative. The West Coast life seems so disconnected from anything she knows or wants that she decides to return.

I found Lottie the least believable of the characters. Things appear to happen to her, and she attracts the oddest of people. The episode in California seems far-fetched, but perhaps that is the point in Lottie’s fractured and disrupted life.  

So, all three young ‘maidens’ are changed by those few months. Jane Gardam has captured that magical time in a young woman’s life. It took me back to my time before I went to university, which involved spending a few days in Israel during the Six-Day War in June 1967 and being evacuated to Cyprus – not then a divided island. The following year I went to America to study in Philadelphia and it seemed as if life was going to be a series of similar adventures. In the same way, twenty years before, the lives of Hetty, Una and Lottie opened out at the end of the war.

It was an exciting time for the girls, but a time for recuperation by the adults.

Jane Gardam

Jane Gardam

Jane Gardam was born in Yorkshire in 1928. She is a prolific writer of children’s and adult’s books. I counted 13 children’s books, many collections of short stories and 9 adult novels and one non-fiction book on her Wikipedia page. 

I recommend The Flight of the Maidens as well as the trilogy: Old FilthThe Man in the Wooden Hat and Old Friends

The Flight of the Maidens by Jane Gardam, published in 2000 by Abacus. 278pp

Related Posts

The Man in the Wooden Hat by Jane Gardam, in the Older Women in Fiction series (October 29014).

A Long Way from Verona by Jane Gardam, her debut novel in 1971, is a recent post on Jacquiwine’s Journal, who refers to it as ‘a warm, funny, thoroughly enjoyable novel that captures the trials of adolescence so engagingly’.

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The Girl with the Louding Voice by Abi Daré 

I have, in previous posts, declared that I would not read novels with ‘girl’ in the title. But I made an exception for this one because it was recommended by readers I respect, and because the main character is a girl. She is fourteen when the novel opens.

And being a girl of 14, it is shocking that the novel opens with the scene where Adunni’s father tells her that he has negotiated with Morufu for her to become his third wife. Her father will receive a generous bride price. This will end Adunni’s ambition to become a girl with a louding voice.

The Girl with the Louding Voice

Adunni is a girl of 14, brought up in Ikati, a village in rural Nigeria. She is the narrator of her story. Her mother died and she is left with two brothers and a father. The family are very poor, and Adunni has already had to give up primary school to take on her mother’s domestic duties. She has an ambition: to become a girl with a louding voice. Here louding means something like amplification, but also confidence. She explains her ambitions to her friend Ms Tia.

‘My mama say education will give me a voice. I want more than just a voice, Ms Tia. I want a louding voice,’ I say. ‘I want to enter a room and people will hear me even before I open my mouth to be speaking. I want to live in this life and help many people so when I grow old and die, I will still be living through the people I am helping. Think it, Ms Tia. If I can go to school and become a teacher, then I can collect my salary and maybe even build my own school in Ikati and be teaching the girls. The girls in my village don’t have much chance for school. I want to change that, Ms Tia, because those girls, they will grow up and born many more great people to make Nigeria even more better than now.’ (224)

On her marriage she goes to live in Morufu’s compound, where she finds his two wives and some daughters. Adunni must endure much for Morufu’s wish for a son. She makes friends with his second wife, Kadije. When Kadije is nearly ready to deliver her baby the two younger wives go to a nearby village apparently to consult with a midwife. But here disaster happens and Adunni must escape the village for ever.

She is trafficked to Lagos, where she works for no wages as a house girl for Big Madam. Here is her description of her first meeting with Big Madam as her employer gets out of her car.

First thing I am seeing is feets. Yellow feets, black toes. There is different colour paint in all the toenails: red, green, orange, purple, gold. The smallest of the toes is having a gold ring on it. Her whole body is almost filling the whole compound as she is coming out. I am now understanding why they are calling her Big Madam. When she come out, she draw deep breath and her chest, wide like blackboard, is climbing up and down, up and down. …
She take two step near to us, then I am seeing her face well. Her face is looking like one devil-child vex with her and paint it with his feets. On top of the orange powder on her face, there is a red line on the two both eyebrows which she is drawing all the way out to her ears. Green powder on the eyelids. Lips with gold lipstick, two cheeks full of red powder. (122-3)

At first it seems as if she has escaped from Ikati and the torments of her marriage to Morufu only to experience slave conditions in the household of the wealthy businesswoman. Her life is made more difficult by Big Papa, who tries to rape her. He is the most despicable of all the characters: he betrays Big Madam, even with her friend, seduces previous house girls, lives off Big Madam and has no job.

But while her time with Big Madam is difficult, she is befriended by Kofi, the Ghanaian cook, and Abu the Muslim driver. She also meets the neighbour, Ms Tia, who is not in the same mould as Big Madam and her rich friends. All three help Adunni to enter a competition for female domestic servants to receive a scholarship to study at school. The drama between Big Madam and Papa allows her eventual freedom.

A day will come when my voice will sound so loud all over Nigeria and the world of it, when I will be able to make a way for other girls to have their own louding voice because I know, that when I finish my education, I will find a way to help them go to school. (312)

Adunni’s story is a very engaging one. To start with she is very young and with few resources to face the obstacles to her ambition. But she has determination, and a very likeable honesty and has deeply rooted integrity. 

Additionally, the author has created a very appealing voice for her narrator. The malapropisms in her use of the English language, not her first language, draws attention to her naivety and her clear sightedness. The reader is forced to see the story from the point of view of an ill-educated but determined and intelligent young woman. Her own voice is louding because she describes the misogyny, the exploitation of young women, the lack of integrity she encounters in Lagos and pursues her ambitions with such determination.

Abi Daré

Abi Daré

Abi Daré was born in Lagos, Nigeria and moved to the UK for her university education. She now lives with her partner and children in Essex. The Girl with the Louding Voice is her first novel and has been well received. It was a New York Times bestseller, chosen as a Book at Bedtime for Radio 4. She was included in the Guardian’s list of 10 best debut novelists in 2020.

I look forward to more from Abi Daré.

The Girl with the Louding Voice by Abi Daré was published in 2020 by Sceptre. 314pp

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Rereading A View of the Harbour by Elizabeth Taylor

One dank and dismal weekend at the end of January my Twitter timeline was alight with praise for Elizabeth Taylor, and for her biography by Nicola Beauman (The Other Elizabeth Taylor). The ripple spread out to include A Very Great Profession, also by Nicola Beauman about women writers between the wars.

Thus provoked, I indulged myself in an afternoon’s reading in front of the fire, my chosen novel was A View of the Harbour by Elizabeth Taylor which I hadn’t read for nine years. My first review was part of a series on this blog which includes all Elizabeth Taylor ‘s novels, including Mossy Trotter written for children, as well as her brilliant short stories. Here are my impressions on rereading the novel.

A View of the Harbour

This was the third of Elizabeth Taylor’s novels, published in 1947, following At Mrs Lippincote’s (1945) and Palladian (1946. She must have been feeling confident in her skills for this novel is concerned with a large number of characters, and with what they see of each other. Not only was the author able to handle the number of characters, differentiating them, showing us their conceits and self-deceptions, but she also is concerned to show the reader how they looked to each other, how they changed. Notice the title.

The novel begins as the trawlers leave the harbour at teatime. We look back at the harbour with the trawler men.

To the men on the boats the harbour was at first dingy and familiar, a row of buildings, shops, café, pub, with peeling plaster of apricot and sky-blue; then as the boats steered purposefully from the harbour-mouth to sea, houses rose up in tiers, the church tower extricated itself from the roofs, the lettering on the shops faded and the sordid became picturesque. (9)

We immediately encounter Bertram who has watched the trawlers leave. Nearly all the large number of characters appear in this first chapter. For this reading I made notes on them as they appeared. I remembered that it was not easy to work out who would become significant. 

Because he is new to this town and an artist, Elizabeth Taylor allows Bertram to be our first guide to the ‘dingy’ row of buildings. He sees a sparsely inhabited place, down at heel, shabby, closed. We are in the first spring following the end of the war. In the past its best times have been in the summer, but even now the rather brasher New Town is a livelier community. It had a cinema after all.

Bertram Hemingway never quite manages to capture in paint what he sees. A former naval man, he seems to be drifting about, being kind to people. He sees himself as delightfully useful to everyone, even sitting with one old woman as she dies. But what he does not see it that he is a selfish person who damages one of his abandoned protégées (Lilly Wilson) and his stance eventually ensnares him in what the reader feels will be a doomed marriage. Elizabeth Taylor describes his self-delusion and condescension, in a way that invites us to consider what we don’t see of ourselves.

He had always had great confidence with women and a tendency to kiss them better, as he called it; only when he had gone, their fears, their anxieties returned, a little intensified, perhaps, but he, of course, would not know that, and remained buoyed up by his own goodness. (138)

Beth Cazubon hardly sees anything despite being a novelist. She is doubtful about the quality of the novels she writes. The name Cazubon must be intended to refer to Dorothea’s dusty and unrealistic husband in George Eliot’s Middlemarch. He never completes his great oeuvre, but Beth finishes her novel as A View of the Harbourends. Beth, we note, is a variation of the novelist’s own name. Here she is taking up her pen to write.

‘This isn’t writing,’ she thought miserably. It’s just fiddling about with words. I’m not a great writer. Whatever I do someone else has always done it before, and better. In ten years’ time no one will remember this book, the libraries will have sold off all their grubby copies of it second-hand and the rest will have fallen to pieces, gone to dust. And, even if I were one of the great ones, who in the long run cares? People walk about in the streets and it is all the same to them if the novels of Henry James were never written. They could not easily care less. No one asks us to write. If we stop, who will implore us to go on? The only goodness that will ever come out of it is surely this moment now, wondering if “vague” will do better than “faint”. Or “faint” than “vague”, and what is to follow; putting one word alongside another, like matching silks, a sort of game.’

Beth is very focused on her writing, is rather casual about her two children and the care of her house and apparently blind to the passion under her nose between her husband and her best friend, who lives next door. A novel that includes a novelist who cannot see what is before her is a daring proposition. Nor does Beth perceive the anger of her daughter Prudence. Prudence is enraged by what she clearly sees happening between her father and Tory, but her lack of maturity and a kind of simpleness makes her impotent.

Mrs Bracey is a great invention. She is spiteful and contrary but is also a figure to be pitied for she has lost her husband and the use of her legs. One of her daughters, Iris, helps her run her second-hand clothes shop, and the other works in the pub. They are a dreary trio, for Mrs Bracey is imperious and full of whims and her daughters long for escape. She has herself moved to the top floor, so that she can keep an eye on the inhabitants of the harbour, and also to oust the young man who rented the room and has been paying court to Iris. It is Mrs Bracey who sees the electric charge between the divorcée Tory Foyle and Robert Cazubon. She observes what is not done, like Henry James in The Portrait of a Lady.

… the very fact of them not smiling at one another when they met was a plain endorsement of their guilt …

Mrs Bracey fears her own decay and death and treats her daughters badly as a result. This character provides much of the comedy of the novel, but the reader observes the truths of Mrs Bracey’s outrageous comments. And she is pinioned through illness, to a single perspective.

The day comes slowly to those who are ill. The night has separated them from the sleepers, who return to them like strangers from a distant land, full of clumsy preparations for living, the earth itself creaking towards the light. (257)

Loneliness is another theme of this novel, of all her novels – nearly everyone is lonely. In their loneliness they don’t always act in their best interests, Mrs Bracey pushes her daughter away by making more and more demands upon her. Lily descends into drinks at the bar and then into a disreputable sex life. Tory faces losing both her best friend and her lover and will settle for a less than wise marriage.

As in her other novels the children are interesting characters. Beth’s younger daughter, Stevie, is a delightful free spirit, who moves between the characters with charm and precocity. Tory’s son Edward writes typical schoolboy letters to his mother from school. And Elizabeth Taylor knows the physicality of young boys. When Tory visits him at his boarding school she makes this observation as they walk to meet Edward’s form master. 

Every boy who passed surreptitiously lunged at Edward, dug an elbow at him, crooked a knee at his behind. (142)

She handles the constantly shifting points of view with ease. The reader is never confused about whose perspective is in focus, and what motivates the characters to see what they see. 

Finally, this novel contains some lovely writing in its transition passages. Newby may have been modelled on Whitby, where Elizabeth Taylor spent some of her war years, but she creates the harbour, the landscape and seascape from her own imagination.

Seen from afar, the lighthouse merely struck deft blows at the darkness, but to anyone standing under the shelter of its white-washed walls a deeper sense of mystery was invoked: the light remained longer, it seemed, and spread wider, indicating greater ranges of darkness and deeper wonders hidden in that darkness. (277)

A View of the Harbour by Elizabeth Taylor (1947) Virago Modern Classic. 313pp

Related Posts

A View of the Harbour (original post from July 2013)

Do we need biographies of writers? looking at The Other Elizabeth Taylor (April 2013)

Elizabeth Taylor – still neglected? (June 2018)

You can find reviews of all her novels and her short story collection on Bookword Blog. Use the search function.

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The Silence of Bystanders – Auschwitz

Auschwitz did not fall from the sky. [Marion Tunki, survivor]

Anyone who has visited Auschwitz-Birkenau must ask themselves, how was this allowed to happen? You view the piles of suitcases, shoes, hair, glasses, gas canisters and ask how could it happen that 1 million people died in this camp?

Anyone who follows the tweets of @AuschwitzMuseum sees family photographs of ordinary people, children, women, men, and reads the brief account of what happened to them. They too will wonder how it was possible. Here’s an example from Sunday 30th January 2022:

30 January 1937 | A French Jewish girl Nicole Blausztajn was born in Paris. She arrived at #Auschwitzon 19 August 1942 in a transport of 997 Jews deported from Drancy. She was murdered in a gas chamber together with 896 people.

Nicole Blausztajn

I asked such questions when I visited Auschwitz in September 2017. Similar questions are posed by Piotr Cywiński, the Director of the Auschwitz Museum, reported in an article in the Guardian on the 77th Holocaust Memorial Day on 27th January. You can read the article ‘The biggest task is to combat indifference’: Auschwitz Museum turns visitors’ eyes to current eventsby Shaun Walker by following the link.

Is the world becoming [more?] indifferent to the suffering of others, and the mass horrors imposed by regimes on minorities? In Yemen? The Uyghurs? LGBT+ peoples? People of Colour? Refugees? 

Auschwitz

The Silence of the Bystanders

I am a historian and seek to understand the events of the past. I was a history teacher, believing that it was my responsibility to help young people understand events in the past and be able to speak out about them as they should. I am a citizen of the world and of Europe and I believe that it is our duty as citizens to keep our mouths open (a maxim ascribed to both Aristotle and Gunter Grass).

One of the most poignant sights of the final months of the war was of local people, at Belsen-Bergen I think, being required to visit the camp, situated in Germany, unlike Auschwitz, and to bury the many, many corpses of those who had died there and been left unburied. At Belsen camp nurses were required to wash patients at the camp after it had been liberated. No doubt they were reluctant to carry out these tasks, but someone was thinking that they needed to know what had happened to the victims. Bystanders must confront their participation.

Doris Clare Zinkeisen 1945, Human Laundry IWM Art.LD5468

The BBC radio broadcast by Richard Dimbleby, his account of driving into Belsen with the Allied troops on 19th April 1945, is still powerful every time you hear it. You can still listen here.

I cannot remember when I first learned about the Holocaust. I grew up after the war, in fear of what men could do to other people, in the shadow of Hiroshima and the Holocaust. Our generation wanted to be sure such things would never happen again. ‘Lest we forget’ say the war memorials. But it appears that we do forget. Some of us forget.

Let us use whatever means we have to remind ourselves and others, to be sure that we do not allow bystanders to be silent or ignorant of such atrocities in the future. Some will respond to films, such as Schindler’s List, or Sophie’s Choice. I have read criticism of the Boy in the Striped Pyjamas and its use in schools because it distorts young people’s understanding of concentration camps and the reactions of local people to the camps.

Twitter accounts may capture the attention by featuring the individuals, the 6 million individuals who lost their lives.

Permanent memorials, as well as special days, can also draw attention to what must not be forgotten. I have visited the memorials in Vienna and in Berlin.

Vienna
Holocaust Memorial, Berlin, May 2014

And, of course, books.

And here are some non-fiction books. 

If this is a man by Primo Levi (1947). The Italian writer was a chemist, and this enabled him to survive the camp in Auschwitz, but he died in 1987, possibly by suicide.

Man’s search for meaning by Viktor Frankl (1959 English edition). Another survivor, a psychiatrist, who wrote about his response to being in the Auschwitz and other camps.

A Train in Winter: A story of Resistance, Friendship and Survival in Auschwitz by Caroline Moorehead (2011). 230 French women who were active against the German Occupation of France were sent to Auschwitz. Some of them survived, but many did not.

After such Knowledge by Eva Hoffman (2004). The daughter of survivors, a Jewish writer considers the effects on her contemporaries of the Holocaust.

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank (1952 English edition), which revealed a life so brutally cut short, a childhood in Amsterdam and hiding as a young woman.

On not being silent bystanders

Auschwitz did not fall out of the sky. Bergen-Belsen did not fall out of the sky. The Holocaust did not fall out of the sky. They were the ideas of people who believed that it was ok to kill off ‘othered’ ethnic groups. And people stood by, in silence, and allowed them to do this.

We must speak out, reject silence, even if that is all we can do when people are oppressed.

Related Posts

Judenplatz, Vienna (March 2013)

Tales from the Vienna Streets (The Hare with Amber Eyes) (July 2013)

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank (May 2018)

Bookword in Poland (Sept 2017)

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Secrets in Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen

I always enjoy rereading Jane Austen’s novels. Whichever one I choose there is always something new to discover, a character I didn’t notice before, or a plot moment that makes sense. I belong to the South West branch of the Jane Austen Society, and have greatly missed our meetings where learned enthusiasts provide insights and pleasure from their presentations. 

I reread Sense and Sensibility in preparation for an online talk later this month, focussing on money in the novel. The characters of John Dashwood and his wife, who in their meanness fail to provide for his stepmother and sisters, have always made a deep impression on me. How easy it is to persuade yourself against undertaking the right thing that you don’t want to do if someone supports you.

Mrs John Dashwood has come in haste to occupy the house of her deceased father-in-law and to usurp his second wife, with no sensitivity but all the entitlement. John Dashwood had some modest suggestions for how to support his relations. But she argues against her husband making any provision for his father’s second wife and three daughters:

It was very well known that no affection was ever supposed to exist between the children of any man by different marriages; and why was he to ruin himself, and their poor little Harry, by giving away all his money to his half sisters? (43)

Selfishness is a key feature of several of the characters in this novel. My own interest in rereading it after 10 years is in the secrecy that so many of the characters employ, and which frequently drives the plot. The reader is in the know of all these secrets, and able to see the affects upon the people involved.

Sense and Sensibility

Mrs Dashwood senior leaves the home of her married life with her three daughters to live in a cottage near Exeter provided by a generous cousin and neighbour, Sir John Middleton. Her two elder daughters are at the age when they have to think about getting married. Elinor, the oldest of the three, is a young woman of good sense and modest skills in drawing. She has formed an attachment to Edward Ferrars and believes that the feeling is mutual although he has not yet declared himself.

Marianne is younger, and more headstrong, inclined to believe that her own sensibilities are a better guide than society’s strict codes of behaviour. On running down a hill in the countryside near their new accommodation she falls and is rescued by Willoughby. He is a well-connected young man, the supposed heir of his aunt’s nearby estate. He and Marianne are immediately attracted to each other, and it is clear to everyone that they are falling in love. After a few happy weeks he suddenly tells the Dashwoods that he must leave Devon and does not expect to return. Has he proposed to Marianne before he left, or not? Marianne does not say, her family do not ask, and when Marianne meets him again in London a few a months later, he rebuffs her.

The novel follows the fortunes of the two sisters, whose natures are in contrast, as they find their way to their marriages. 

Secrets in Sense and Sensibility

Openness is not a feature of society in Jane Austen’s day. Some secrets can be seen as discretion, information that should not be widely discussed. Some secrets are power, to control of the behaviour of others. And some are protection from society’s codes.

Elinor, as a young woman of evident sense and thoughtfulness, becomes the recipient of two secrets. The first is Colonel Brandon’s story about his brother’s wife. Her reputation and that of her daughter has been ruined by a seducer. This is at the bottom of the Colonel’s sudden departure from Devon, and he will not reveal it despite all attempts by Mrs Jennings to discover it. His revelation to Elinor in part demonstrates his good character and also how much he is deserving of our sympathy.

The second secret is imparted to Elinor in order to control her behaviour. Lucy Sharpe is an ambitious and selfish young woman who some years before caught the affections of Edward Ferrars, and they became secretly engaged. Lucy tells Elinor of this and by making her her confidante it is impossible for Elinor to become as close to Edward as she might have wished. The reader can see how mean-spirited Lucy is and understand why Edward Ferrars behaves with reserve towards Elinor.

Marianne is not open with her mother and sister about her relationship with Willoughby, partly because she does not wish to be controlled by society’s codes, would rather be governed by her own disposition. This lack of openness allows her mother to believe the best of Willoughby, and to fail to warn Marianne about the dangers she is in, not least from a broken heart. After her great disappointment at Willoughby’s rejection, and the decline of her spirits, Marianne becomes quite wrapped up in herself and eventually falls seriously ill. Only when she recovers does she come to see her behaviour as wilful and selfish rather than the expression of great sensibility. She takes herself to task and after listing all the people she feels she has wronged, and reflecting on Elinor’s troubles with Edward Ferrars she acknowledges this neglect to her sister in this way:

Not less when I knew you to be unhappy, than when I had believed you to be at ease, did I turn away from every exertion on duty or friendship scarcely allowing sorrow to exist but with me, regretting only that heart which had deserted and wronged me, and leaving you, for whom I professed an unbounded affection, to be miserable for my sake.’ (337-8)

Mrs Jennings is a colourful figure, initially it seems without any self-awareness to prevent her enquiring into people’s secrets. She enjoys gossip and teasing her young acquaintances. But she redeems herself by her generosity and her ability to act in the best interests of the two Dashwood sisters. 

Mr John Dashwood is against secrets. Edward Ferrars is his wife’s brother. But when Lucy Sharpe suddenly marries Edward’s brother, Robert, he expresses this view

The secrecy with which everything had been carried on between them, was rationally treated as enormously heightening their crime, because, had any suspicion of it occurred to the others, proper measures would have been taken to prevent the marriage; and he called upon Elinor to join with him in regretting that Lucy’s engagement with Edward had not rather been fulfilled … (360)

He demonstrates a lack of understanding of Elinor’s feelings by this outburst. There is something a little chilling about the idea of ‘proper measures’ being taken to prevent the marriage. It sits alongside another rather uncomfortable observation about Marianne’s eventual marriage (not to Willoughby). Her mother and sisters and even Mrs Jennings are united in encouraging Marianne to accept this second suitor.

With such a confederacy against her … – what could she do? (366)

Jane Austen has a great deal of fun at the expense of those characters for whom selfishness and lack of generosity are paramount. They are condemned from their own mouths as I have indicated. And those who would indulge their children can be criticised too: Mrs Dashwood with Marianne, Mrs John Dashwood with Harry,  and Mrs Ferrars with Robert. The novel nicely indicates the tension in society between being rational and restrained on the one hand and emotional and following one’s desires on the other.

Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen was her first published novel, appearing in 1811. I used the Penguin English Library edition of 1969. 371pp

Related Posts

Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen. On Bookword December 2019

Pursuing Jane Austen (including Sanditon). On Bookword May 2019

Lady Susan by Jane Austen. On Bookword April 2015.

NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE!  On Bookword June 2014

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Writing in the time of Covid

Many people have reported finding it challenging to write in the time of the pandemic. I know this from my writing group, from twitter and from my own experience. Why this has been so is not entirely clear to me, but I have an idea about it.

Here are some writing achievements that I have managed during the pandemic.

136 posts on Bookword Blog

I have blogged consistently every 5 days (except over Christmas in 2021). On 20th March 2020 I blogged about sleep in fiction and136 posts later I am blogging about writing. Ten days ago, I blogged about books that help me when I can’t sleep. I suspect that not sleeping and not writing during the pandemic are connected.

So, I have been reading a great deal in order to provide material for these posts. I checked on my reading log and find that I have read 150 books since March 25th 2020. And yes, I do keep records of all this.

Co-editing More Gallimaufry 

One of my two greatest writing-related achievement has been as a member of the team co-editing our writing group’s anthology, More Gallimaufry. Technically I am the publisher of this fine volume. Some of the work involved was tedious, and some quite tricky, but overall it was an honour to be involved in the production of such a fine volume. Twenty-one writers from our group provided poems, short stories and memoirs for our project. Three of our writers, who are also visual artists, provided the cover and the internal illustrations. It has been selling well since I posted about it in mid-November. 

Writing a novel with my grandson

In December my grandson, aged 10, tested positive for Covid. We live in the same village so normally if he is ill and off school I am involved in his care. But he had to isolate, so I had to find some other ways of helping him endure the ten days in which he was restricted.

My daughter sent me a photograph of Josh with our dog. The dog is a beautiful cocker spaniel called Lupin and is devoted to all family members. The photo was taken on the first day of Josh’s isolation, and they both look a bit fed up with being indoors. The picture of the two of them sparked an idea. I found an empty notebook, printed the picture, glued it onto the cover and wrote chapter one of a story about a glum boy and his dog who had super-powers. I invited Josh to write the next section.

A couple of days later Josh rang me, read the continuation of the story that he had written, and which he had printed out and stuck into our book. Soon after I collected the notebook and completed chapter 3, and so it went on until Josh was freed from isolation and we had seven chapters in our book. Two chapters were written together during the Christmas holidays. After a walk with the dog during which we discussed some ideas, we went back to my house and completed the story. We gave it a title: Josh and Lupin’s Amazing Adventure. We made the rest of the family listen to our reading.

For me, this was the second of the two productive writing activities since the pandemic began. I especially enjoyed the creativity of the final two sessions when Josh and I wrote together. We bounced ideas of each other – a pitchfork, baddies who couldn’t swim, a host of dogs. Then we developed them and found amusing ways to weave them into our story. And, of course, we left the ending open for more adventures, which will be necessary if I have to isolate. [Sometimes I say when I have to isolate.]

LATE Update: Josh has Covid again, so it is possible there will be further adventures.

Writing in a time of Covid

Once again, I notice that writing together, collaborative projects are often the most enjoyable, and the most creative. These have been restricted as we have endured social distances over the last 22 months.

From this observation I learn that as we reclaim more flexibility, more opportunities, I can pursue more collaborative possibilities to continue to develop as a writer. 

I may be able to finish that short story about Phyllis with a bit of help. And perhaps even get someone to help me retrieve that novel from its drawer. And I haven’t mentioned the poems, a small number of poems, that I have written during this time. Perhaps there is more to explore there too? 

Related posts

More Gallimaufry: another achievement for the writing group (November 2021)

What I did during Lockdown – my Covid diary (June 2020)

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