10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World by Elif Shafak

When a member of our book group suggested this novel for us to read in 2024, I was enthusiastic. I had very much enjoyed The Architect’s Apprentice (2014) and admired the scope of The Island of Missing Trees (2022). 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World was published in (2019) and had received good reviews. The book includes references to sexual abuse, and the life of a sex worker. For this Elif Shafak was investigated by the Turkish authorities. She lives in exile from Turkey.

I admire her writing for its lavishness and for its inventiveness. The Architect’s Apprentice is one of the richest works of fiction I have ever read, featuring an elephant, the building of some of the greatest architectural masterpieces of the Ottoman Empire, life in the harem, and the travels of the apprentice. The Island of Missing Trees featured a fig tree from Cyprus that was transplanted to North London, and which contributed to the narrative about the divisions in Cyprus’ past. I wouldn’t say that it was entirely successful, but it was interesting.

In 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World the main character has been murdered, but before her brain stops functioning it is recalling life events through smell and taste, and this is a device to learn about Leila’s life. Richness of descriptions and innovation are combined.

10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World

10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World has been described as a love letter to Istanbul. More accurately, it’s a love letter to the outcasts, underdogs and misfits of Istanbul. Leila has been murdered, and her recollection of her life in the last 10 minutes and 38 seconds reveals that she had five friends, all misfits in Istanbul, as she is. In the second half of the book, the friends come together to reclaim Leila’s body, and then to give her the burial they believe she should have. Murder and funerals might seem to be sombre subjects, but there is plenty of merriment and celebration in this novel.

In many ways it is a book of lists: the 10 minutes before her brain activity ceased, her five friends, and the many descriptions of places and events in her life. Leila’s life began with salt, for example, and later, when her brother was born, with goat stew. We follow her as a rebellious young woman in Turkey in the 50s and 60s. She suffers sexual abuse by a member of her family and to cover this up her family plan a wedding to her cousin. She runs away to the capital and becomes a prostitute. This life is no easier, and she remembers an incident with sulphuric acid. On a happier note she also finds her five friends and has a brief but happy marriage with a communist student. 

We do not understand her murder until the second part of the novel, where we also meet the coroner who espouses the theory that the brain continues after the heart has stopped beating. And perhaps more important that the activity of her brain, the novel describes how the significance of Leila, or anyone, on her friends and family also lives on after death. This is an exploration of death within a community, a city, a family, 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World.

And Elif Shafak tells a good story, even if the Turkish authorities did not like it. Leila’s life story is rich with detail of her family in the city of Van, where her birth mother had to give up her title of mother to her husband’s first wife. Where to be a girl was a definite disadvantage, especially in terms of education, arranged marriage, abuse and so-called ‘honour killings’ (where there is no honour at all). In Istanbul, the lives of a prostitute, and of the other misfits, are vividly described, with all the risks and abuse that the friends must endure. The events take place for the most part from the 1960s, when Istanbul was changing very rapidly, including as a result of the opening of the bridge over the Bosphorus in 1973.

Here is an example of how she uses lists, and of an excellent description of a character, Bitter Ma, the madam of the brothel in which Leila works:

The new madam was a woman of ample proportions, resolute gait, and rouged cheeks that sagged like flaps of staked leather. She had a tendency to address every man who walked in, whether a regular or not, as ‘my pasha’. Every few weeks she visited a hair-dressing salon named Split Ends where she had her hair dyed a different shade of blonde. Her wide-set, protuberant eyes gave her an expression of permeant surprise, although she rarely was. A web of broken capillaries fanned out across her mighty nose, like streams threading their way down a mountainside. No-one knew her real name, Both the prostitutes and the punters called her ‘Sweet Ma’ to her face and ‘Bitter Ma’ behind her back. She was all right as far as madams went, but she had a tendency to do everything to excess: she smoked too much, swore too much, shouted too much and was simply too much of a presence in their lives – a veritable maximum dose. (47)

All members of our reading group enjoyed this novel, some for the second time, and it produced a lively discussion about Istanbul, Turkey, death and reading other novels by Elif Shafak.

Elif Shafak

Elif Shafak is a Turkish-British writer, born in 1971. She writes in Turkish and English. She has published 11 works of fiction, some in English. She lives in London, and has lived in many other countries, including being brought up in Turkey. She says she carries Istanbul in her soul, and many of her books feature the city, as this one does. I admire her ability to tell a strong story through some well-drawn characters, and to innovate with some interesting narrative tropes, such as a talking tree.

10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World by Elif Shafak, published in 2019. I used the edition from Penguin 312pp. Shortlisted for Booker Prize 2019

I have reviewed two other novels by Elif Shafak on Bookword blog:

The Architect’s Apprentice in April 2023,

and The Island of Missing Trees in August 2022 

6 Comments

Filed under Books, Reading, Reviews, Travelling with books, Writing

6 Responses to 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World by Elif Shafak

  1. Lynda Haddock

    I was absorbed by this innovative and courageous novel

  2. Carole Jones

    Your post has reminded me that I want to buy this work – and reread it. I first searched for the book, and read it (it was a library loan), after a chance mention in a magazine. I found it both beautiful and disturbing – and it led me to read far more about the repression of women in Turkey – and about Elif Shafak. She is such a brave woman, that I feel the least I can do, now, is to buy and read/reread her works… as well as contributing to groups that oppose all such repressions and evil. Thanks for your post.

    • Caroline

      I am impressed by how different her novels are from each other, and how innovative and creative her writing is. Enjoy your re-read.
      Caroline

  3. I really enjoyed this novel – it was a very sensory experience because almost every page we got an insight into the smells and tastes of Turkey and Istanbul.

    • Caroline

      Thanks for this comment. It was definitely one of the strongest pleasures of reading this novel – to experience the sensuality of Istanbul through her words. She is an accomplished writer in so many ways.
      Caroline

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