Woman at Point Zero by Nawal el Saadawi

Bookword has reached the 1970s in the Decades Project with this novel from Egypt. I read Woman at Point Zero by Nawal el Saadawi when it was first published in English in the 1980s. Like many readers I was shocked by the brutality and suffering in Firdaus’s story. It took its place among the important literature of the so-called second feminist wave.

In the project we have moved from Anglo-centric literature to a novel in translation and originally written in Arabic.

The Story

Woman at Point Zero is introduced as a true story, and framed by a psychiatrist’s visit to a woman’s prison where Firdaus is awaiting execution. The psychiatrist, requests an interview with the condemned woman, but she is refused until her last night. She summons the doctor and tells her story.

Firdaus was born with two disadvantages: being a female and to parents who lived in poverty. She lives her whole life on the margins. She is orphaned while still young, and then taken by her uncle to Cairo where he sends her to primary school. On his marriage she boards at secondary school, which she loves. But on graduating she is married off to an old man, a relative of her uncle’s wife. The old man is one in a long line of men who treat her badly, exploiting her sexually, forcing her into domestic servitude and beating her on any excuse. She runs away and is rescued by the next abuser, and the pattern continues until she is rescued and groomed by a madame.

She leaves this comfortable life when she understands that she is as exploited by the woman as by the men, sets herself up as a prostitute, and for the first time knows financial independence and wealth. But the life still depends upon men, so she gives it up to work in an office, but is betrayed again by a man she fell in love with and who only wanted to exploit her sexually for free, she returns to prostitution.

But this is threatened by a gangster who offers her protection, from his own violence. She kills him. She has reached the point where there is nothing, point zero. Her freedom is to die.

Why Firdaus’s story matters

Her story is recognizable in the lives of all women, despite the novel being set in Egypt, despite being written 40 years ago, and despite her career choice. The abuse is recognizable in our own society today. Women still suffer from violent abuse, and we still struggle with residual beliefs that women’s role is to service men.

At the time it was published in English Woman at Point Zero reinforced everything that the second wave of feminism was uncovering. It was passed around and discussed widely in my circle.

Towards the end of her account Firdaus tells us about the bleak prospects for women to escape persecution.

All women are victims of deception. Men impose deception on women and punish them for being deceived, force them down to the lowest level and punish them for falling so low, bind them in marriage and then chastise them with menial service for life, or insults, or blows.

Now I realized that the least deluded of all women was the prostitute. That marriage was the system built on the cruellest suffering of women. (117-8)

Her feminism is best understood as a criticism of capitalism, supported by Islam in parts of the world.

Nawal el Saadawi

Nawal el Saadawi by Mansour Nasiri via WikiCommons

Born in 1931 at 86 Nawal el Saadawi is still alive, and still speaking out. She was trained in medicine and psychiatry and Firdaus’s story is based on the life of a woman she visited in prison. Nawal el Saadawi worked for improved help for women in Egypt, as Director General for Public Health Education. Women who stand out often become enemies of prominent men and in 1981 she herself was arrested and imprisoned by Sadat’s regime. She was released after his assassination later that year. She worked for a time in the US but has returned to Egypt where she is still in the public eye, for example she was among the protestors in Tahrir Square in 2011.

Early in the novel Firdaus, still a child, suffers genital cutting. The practice of genital mutilation has only recently been taken seriously in this country and appears to be acceptable in other parts of the world. Nawal el Saadawi is one of the most distinguished voices in the campaigns against FGM.

Her second novel was published in1976 God Dies by the Nile, and her study of Arabic women, The Hidden Face of Eve, a year later. In 2016 she explained how hard it was to get her voice heard she says this:

The colonial capitalist powers are mainly English- or French-speaking … I am still ignored by big literary powers in the world, because I write in Arabic, and also because I am critical of the colonial, capitalist, racist, patriarchal mind set of the super-powers. [quotation from Wikipedia, from an article in the New African]

Woman at Point Zero takes its place in my plans to read more Women in Translation (#WIT) as well as in the Decades Project.

Woman at Point Zero Nawal el Saadawi, first published in 1975 and in translation by Zed Books in 1983. 142 pp

Translated from the Arabic by Sherif Hetata, her third husband.

The Decades Project

The idea for the Decades Project originated in my library’s Reading Passport scheme. I have adapted it by selecting a book from each decade from 1900 onwards, reading one a month, and reviewing it on this blog.

Reading passport 315

Previous posts in the Project

The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula Le Guin, published in 1969

The Grass is Singing by Doris Lessing, published in 1950

They were Sisters by Dorothy Whipple, published in 1943

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier, published in 1938

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie, published in 1926

O Pioneers by Willa Cather, published in 1913

The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton, published in 1905

The next decade: 1970s

I have not yet decided what to read in September for the decade of the 1980s. Please make suggestions for subsequent decades, 1990s (October) and 2000s (November).

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4 Comments

Filed under Books, Feminism, Reading, Reviews, The Decade project, Women in Translation

4 Responses to Woman at Point Zero by Nawal el Saadawi

  1. I also read this when it first came out in translation from the wonderful Zed books (who sadly don’t seem to do fiction anymore). It was the first time I came across FGM and it’s sad that it’s taken another thirty years for this to be taken seriously in Britain. Nawal el Saadawi is a remarkable woman.

    • Caroline

      Yes it has taken too long for the issue of FGM to get much attention, let alone be treated as abuse.

      She is remarkable, still fighting, still saying that things need to be better for women.

      Thanks for these comments Anne,
      Caroline

  2. Mickey Reid

    Thank you for your reviews. I enjoy them very much and like to follow up by reading the book(s) in each review.
    I will make a few suggestions for your Decades Project:
    Margaret Drabble: The Radiant Way, 1987 which I have read and reread several times; Seven Sisters, 2002; The Dark Flood Rises, 2016 which is the next book I will read — tomorrow.
    Alice Munro, the Canadian writer of wonderful short stories who was given the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2013, and the Man Booker International Prize in 2009:
    The Progress of Love, 1986; The Love of a Good Woman, 1998; Runaway, 2004.
    Margaret Atwood: Cat’s Eye, 1988.
    Anne Tyler: The Accidental Tourist, 1985 and its excellent movie version; Ladder of Years, 1995.
    Penelope Lively: Moon Tiger, 1987; Passing On, 1989; Heat Wave, 1996; Family Album, 2009.
    Perhaps I should have listed my favourites by decade rather than by author, but I wanted to show that most have excellent books over several decades.

    • Caroline

      Thanks for these comments and suggestions.
      Just to respond: I have reviewed The Dark Flood Rises by Mgt Drabble as part of the Older Women in Fiction series.
      And so was Penelope Lively’s Paper Moon.
      Alice Munro features in some posts about short stories, at which she is brilliant.
      Anne Tyler’s Accidental Tourist has also been reviewed on this blog. Again I think she is an excellent writer.

      You can see that out tastes run along the same lines.

      And thank you for your comments about the reviews on Bookword.

      Caroline

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