Tag Archives: Writers & Artists Year Book

Some Recommended Books for Writers

So what books about writing do you recommend to other writers? Our writing group recently pooled titles they found useful. A book that was mentioned by more than one writer was The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron. Many beginner writers follow her recommendations to get started.

Establishing a Writerly Routine

I must admit that the advice to establish a routine, to find your best time and always write in it, to always write 500 words a day and so forth does not fit the life of an ordinary mortal. Nor is it necessarily good advice. Sometimes routine is just what you don’t want. However, I have adapted Morning Pages, but it’s the only bit of routine I have. I wrote about it here.

Virginia Woolf noted that she used her writing diary to loosen the ligaments.

‘… the habit of writing thus for my own eye only is good practice. It loosens the ligaments. Never mind the misses and stumbles … I believe that during the past year I can trace some increase of ease in my professional writing which I attribute to my causal half hours after tea.’ (A Writer’s Diary, April 20th 1919)

More After Tea Pages than Morning Pages. Many writers benefit from writing to get into the zone and to work out their glitches and never show it to anyone.

Reading for Writers

The most succinct advice to writers of all levels of experience, and perhaps most frequently quoted advice too, comes from Stephen King:

If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot. There’s no way round these two things that I am aware of, no short cut. (On Writing)

Specific advice on how to read productively for writers comes in Reading for Writers by Francine Prose. Putting the advice into practice was the subject of an earlier post on this blog called Reading for Writers.

Some specific recommendations

For help with story structure I was advised (by a published author) to read Into the Woods by John Yorke. It was excellent advice, and Yorke’s book has helped me with the revision of the first draft of my novel.

Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott is an excellent and realistic book for many aspects of writing, especially about going on going on. The title refers to her father’s advice about completing some homework. You just tackle it bird by bird.

A few months ago I recommended Ursula Le Guin’s collection of essays Words are my Matter: writings about life and books 2000-2016. We have much to learn from our most experienced writers. I especially warmed to her thoughts on imagination and how you must learn to develop it.

Currently I am dipping into Philip Pullman’s Daemon Voices: Essays on Storytelling, full of interesting observations from a craftsman.

Resources for publishing

The Writers & Artists Year Book.

And Mslexia’s Indie Press Guide, now out in a second edition.

The poets amongst in our writing group recommended these:

Writing Poetry by Peter Samson

An Ode Less Travelled by Stephen Fry

Of course you could just follow this:

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4 Reasons to Enter Writing Competitions

Why oh why do I do it? It happens over and over again. I notice a short story competition in a writing magazine or through Twitter. It has a desirable prize: money or publication or prestige or, best of all, all three. I check the rules, polish the story, pay the entry fee and upload the file.

Rosette from Cornwall Agricultural show by Matnkat, via WikiCommons

Rosette from Cornwall Agricultural show by Matnkat, via WikiCommons

Polishing the story can take some time. It might require checking former prize winners’ stories, revision to meet the word total, or complete revision because the story has been resting. It always requires a day or two of polishing

I press SEND adding an extra-virtual blessing. I have hope. This may be the one. I have high hopes for a couple of days, and then they descend gradually, and I forget about hoping until I realise that the day of judgement has long passed and I have heard nothing. Yet again I have not won a writing competition. I am very good at not winning short story competitions.

So why do I do it?

Four reasons to enter

  1. The deadline provides some external but strong discipline. The limits provided by the terms of entry are also a useful tool: to keep to 2000 words, and to ensure you have the right font, line spacing, and no mention of your name on the document. As writers of short fiction and flash fiction know, the limits of the form distil the choice of words. Every word must do its work to justify its place in the story.
  2. If I can do all that well enough, follow the rules and pay the entry fee I feel I’ve achieved something.
  3. Recently I entered an international short story competition, and was offered a critique of my piece for a few £££s more. I was feeling flush and agreed. As a result of the feedback received I already know the story wont win the competition. But the critique was excellent and showed me where I needed to do some work to improve it.
  4. I might win. There is a story about the lottery. A scrooge-like Mr Suggs was pestering God to let him win the lottery. Day after day he prayed to God to win the jackpot. Eventually God was exasperated. ‘You want to win the jackpot, Mr Suggs?’ he bellowed. ‘Do me a favour and meet me half way: buy a lottery ticket.’ So if I want to win a writing competition I do have to enter.

What other writers say

In her blog Top of the Tent Safia Moore lists four international competitions for short story writers with prize money. She suggests them for writers who have included competition entry in their new year’s resolutions. Motivation, she suggests, is a key feature of such entries, but the competition can be tough.

Writing in a recent edition of Mslexia Mahsuda Snaith revealed that she had entered about 300 competitions. Like me, she counts submitting among her achievements when she isn’t winning. Unlike me, she has had success, not least as a finalist in the Mslexia Novel Competition in 2013. And that success got her signed up with an agent. Mslexia has a short story competition with a deadline in March 2015.

147 A&WYBClaudia Cruttwell shared her experience of entering competitions for novels on the Writer&Artists website. The value she reports is in taking a fresh look at her MS and seeing it from the perspective of a judge. The requirement for a synopsis also focuses her mind. She hopes to attract an agent. And while she likes feeling pro-active as she enters she warns against the seductiveness of the volume of competitions. Note to self: this is a useful warning.

She’s right. There are so many. There is a long list of competition awards and prizes in the Writers’ and Artists’ Yearbook with its own index. I have the supplement of a writing journal on my desk. ‘Plan your writing year,’ it prompts. 13 pages of competitions are listed and there are also ads for many of them. The editor suggests that competitions are motivational, ‘a great way to keep your writing mind sharp’ and to bring you to the attention of agents and publishers.

Lynsey May suggests discrimination in selecting a competition and some research into what you might get out of it in her post Always read the fine print. She relates a sad experience to support this advice.

Copa El Pais – Paraguay, by Flahm, via WikiCommons

Copa El Pais – Paraguay, by Flahm, via WikiCommons

I’m pausing for a time as far as competitions go, while I do my writing course. In addition I have a non-fiction work in progress with two colleagues, as well as other things to do – suc as reading and writing posts for the blog. So I wont enter any competitions for a couple of months. But I will tell you if I win.

 

Have you got any good experiences of entering a writing competition? What’s your secret? What’s your motivation?

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