Tag Archives: Marianne Coleman

After Publication

The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change by Caroline Lodge, Eileen Carnell and Marianne Coleman was published by Policy Press in early September. I have lost count of the number of books which I have co-authored or co-edited. That may read as rather big-headed, but I have been at it since 1991 – a quarter of a century!

But I have never stopped being excited about publication, the moment when one’s ideas are launched into the world, when you hope other people will benefit from one’s experience and reflection. It’s like a baby grown up and off into the world.

The delight of the printed book

There is pleasure in contemplating the newly printed book. All new books have a charm, the unbroken spine, the clean pages, the unblemished cover. When it’s a cover which announces one’s name and that title over which we laboured for months, then it has extra delight.

Then there is the pleasure of the pile of new books, see below. This is surely one of the pleasures of entering a bookshop – multiple copies, many volumes.

And, I admit, the smell of a new book is also to be savoured.

The promotional articles are done

Following publication we put ourselves about, writing promotional articles:

Eileen wrote for Mature Times, an article on the fear of ageing and how older people are ignored in commercial promotions. The stimulus for this was Jeremy Paxman’s demonstration of ageism in the FT diaries of 19th August 2016.

At the reception desk of a hotel to which I checked in this week was a pile of free copies of the Mature Times, which calls itself “the voice of our generation”. Oh God, I thought, the cheeky bastards are including me. Back off. For this must be the most unfashionable publication in Britain. Who wants to be called “mature”, like an old cheese? We all know that “mature” means on the verge of incontinence, idiocy and peevish valetudinarianism. They might as well have named it the “Surgical Stocking Sentinel” or “Winceyette Weekly”.

There was a lot more of this kind of thing in his piece. It seemed to us that a man of 66 was not doing his generation any favours, rather it was lazy journalism to accuse us of being on the verge of incontinence, idiocy and peevish valetudinarianism. (I had to look up that last word. It means in poor health or obsessed by poor health, which you probably knew.)

Marianne provided a post for the blog of ILC-UK (International Longevity Centre) on the future challenges of health and care in an ageing society.

She also posted on the Henpicked website, an article called How do you feel about Ageing?

For the Policy Press blog, I did a piece on age-blaming using the example of what people had said about older voters following the EU Referendum.

For the on-line magazine Discover Society we produced a piece about older people and housing, and the need for more affordable housing and for planning to take account of local views and construction that adopts a more age-inclusive attitude.

I found that writing these articles was much like writing the book itself, although more condensed.

Book promotion

Our publishers, Policy Press, have done sterling work to promote our book. In addition we announced the publication

  • on Facebook,
  • on twitter,
  • to every friend,
  • and to every professional connection we could think of.
  • I blogged about it.
  • Some magazine offered copies as a prize.
  • We gave flyers to our local bookshops.

And then …?

We waited.

We waited for reviews.

And for our readers to tell us how good it is, or how they agreed with this or wanted to argue about that …

I have been asked, ‘how’s the book going?’ And I have to say, ‘I have no idea’. I have no idea about sales: what would be good sales, what would be disappointing? Above all, I don’t think the world or even society has changed yet as a result of our book. I don’t know if it has even been nudged. That’s how it goes with most books. You don’t know.

That’s what I have learned, over the years, that after publication one waits. It’s an anti-climax after all that work. And you may never know whether you have piqued the interest of any reader, given them new ideas, encouraged debate. Sometimes people will tell you how important you book was to them, or how they saw it in a bookshop, or they don’t like the cover. But that’s it.

Why do we do it? Why write books? Well why do we?

Copies of The New Age of Ageing are available through the Policy Press website, where you can obtain a discount.

Related Posts

From February until publication day we posted at least once a month about the stages of book production from bright ideas to publication. You can find the posts here:

Publication Day September 2016

Trouble with Titles and Covers (August)

Marketing our Book (August)

Learning to be old by Eileen Carnell (July)

Ageing: it is not ‘them and us’, it is all ‘us’ by Marianne Coleman (June)

Getting feedback to improve our writing (May)

First Catch Your Publisher (April)

One Book, Three Authors (March)

Writers’ Residential (February)

 

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Publication Day. The New Age of Ageing

The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change, by Caroline Lodge, Eileen Carnell and Marianne Coleman, published by Policy Press on 7th September 2016.

Caroline writes

Publication Day is here! So exciting to see something that we laboured over together, gave to the publisher, saw in various stages of completion and finally have copies in our possession! You can too have a pile of books because Publication Day is here ….

The New Age of Ageing is out. Like my fellow writers, I feel proud of what we have achieved. I am especially pleased that this book has edge, says something that no other book is saying, has used the voices of so many people, has made research accessible to readers.

And what we have to say is in the sub-title: how society needs to change. Too much age-blaming, age-hating and age-fearing going on. I like that we have turned this round so that we provide some different ways of seeing our society, because there will be more older people than previously. There is an alternative to ageism and segregation. We call it age-integration and we suggest ways in which it can be achieved and benefit everyone.

Please read and enjoy and let us know what you think.

280 pile

I asked my co-authors to tell us how how they each feel about the book and what they hope for it

Eileen wrote

Oh the joy of holding a brand new published book in one’s hand. I am thrilled, overjoyed. It is out there and available for the world to read.

And at the same time I am bereft – the book has gone – it doesn’t feel part of me anymore. I do not wake up every morning with that pressing research to consider. It has left a gap in my life.

This has been the pattern over my writing career. I recognise the mixed feelings and I am itching to start the next book. It is there – a little embryo. So I see writing as a never-ending process rather than a finished product. But hold on a minute. Let’s savour the moment.

It is a time to rejoice. I remember the first time a book of mine was published and going out to dinner to celebrate with a co-author. We took the book along and sat it on a chair between us. I don’t quite get the same giddy feeling 40 years on but it is still special moment and a reason to smile. Writing a book is a long slow difficult process taking years to complete. And as previous blog posts suggest getting published can be a really hard, tortuous time. Well, we made it.

The reason we made it is that we worked so well as a team – the three of us writing collaboratively and sharing our heart-felt concerns. The issues really matter to us.

Getting the testimonials suggest that this book is going to be well received:

This book demolishes the myths that dominate the discussion of ageing … a compelling and original account that gets to the heart of what needs to change in order to create a better, more age-inclusive society.

This observation is just what we hope for the book. We want things to change – we want people to think differently about the issues of ageing and to stamp out ageist practices and policies. We want readers to have their senses aroused, personally and politically. We want this book to challenge the stereotypical image of older people as frail and on the scrap heap. And wouldn’t it be fantastic to think that this book represents one small step in bringing about this change.

Marianne, Eileen and Caroline meeting at Kings Place in 2014

Marianne, Eileen and Caroline meeting at Kings Place in 2014

Marianne wrote

Now our book The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change is actually published and available I feel very pleased and proud of what the three of us have done. It is important to sit back and enjoy this time before starting to think: ‘what about the next project?’

Looking back, it is hard to remember that we actually had to work rather hard to achieve this. What I remember are the wonderful and productive meetings we had from time to time to discuss the development and progress of the book, and in between the meetings, the exchange of dozens of e-mails which kept up the creative and supportive dialogue between us.

I am glad that we went to meet some of the people involved at the publishers Policy Press in Bristol, where looking at the marketing of the book was a further part of the creative process, making us think of who our audience might be and who, in the media might be most interested in what we have to say.

The fact that the book is now in physical form is the end of something for us, but it is the beginning of the book’s real life as it will appear in bookshops, libraries and eventually on people’s bedside tables and amongst their holiday reading and hopefully encourage critical thinking about the popular general view of ageing.

Along with the other two authors, I hope that the book will be read by individuals who are heartened and encouraged by what we have written, as they or others in their family move into older age. We also hope that it will be read and will potentially influence policy makers and opinion formers who will find that their view of older people has been modified. My personal message (see earlier blog) is about not seeing older people as ‘other’. It is not ‘them and us’, it is all ‘us’.

274 New Age

Copies of The New Age of Ageing are available through the Policy Press website, at a 20% discount. It costs £14.99 £11.99. You can also download one chapter for free!

Related Posts

Every month since February we have written posts about the stages from bright ideas to publishing our book. You can find them here:

Trouble with Titles and Covers (August 2016)

Marketing our Book (August)

Learning to be old by Eileen Carnell (July)

Ageing: it is not ‘them and us’, it is all ‘us’ by Marianne Coleman (June)

Getting feedback to improve our writing (May)

First Catch Your Publisher (April)

One Book, Three Authors (March)

Writers’ Residential (February)

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Trouble with Titles and Covers

The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change comes out on 7th September. One of the hardest bits of writing our book was finding the right title. And another was agreeing the cover design. These two aspects of book production carry the first ideas of the book to possible readers. Despite their importance, for us, both title and cover came after we had finished the manuscript.

274 New Age

Finding the title

For most of its time, from first ideas, through the proposal and contract signing stages, and even as we were writing the chapters, our book was called Ageing now: the impact on individuals, families, communities and society. We had already rejected Positive Ageing and We’re Still Here, although that one made it as a chapter title. You can see where we were going with Ageing Now. But we knew it was not right, and asked the publisher to consider it a working title. What should the book be called?

This is a summary of the contents:

Our society, communities, family and individuals have much to gain and less to fear from our ageing population.

We give innovative ways of considering ageing, challenging widespread account of it as simply problematic and burdensome. We counter ageism and the political opportunism that obscures the opportunities and benefits of age. We reject the common belief that transitions into older age bring inevitable pain, loneliness, depression and dependency whilst recognising the challenges involved.

The book challenges common assumptions about ageing and offers a new vision for an age-inclusive society.

You can access a free copy of Chapter 4 called Time bombs and Agequakes: the economics of ageing: here.

The summary above hardly does justice to our arguments, and yet we had to compress it even further into a title. We wanted to find a title that told our readers that this book is about how all society is changing, and everyone will be affected by increased longevity. We did not want a title that suggested we were guiding people into a happier old age, although we hope it can contribute to that. So out went Positive Ageing, The Joys of Ageing and all associated suggestions. Other suggestions were rejected by the marketing people at Policy Press for not being strong enough.

The hunt for the title took many emails, many, many emails. I consulted my writing group. Emma said that even though we had not yet found the title, it would eventually reveal itself to us, we should be patient. And it did. An idea had come from Marianne’s husband, John. Finally we all agreed on The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change.

Turning pages of a book by Mummelgrummel, February 2013 via WikiCommons

Turning pages of a book by Mummelgrummel, February 2013 via WikiCommons

Cover

And then we had similar issues with the cover. Just for a moment consider what images you would put on a book about ageing. Older people? Older people being active? We were conscious of the clichéd image of older people on bicycles, tandems and motorcycles with sidecars. We have been writing about retiring and ageing for some years and our publications have been blessed with all these!

We learned about how difficult covers can be on a previous occasion. Some years ago Eileen and I wrote a book aimed at secondary schools. The publisher’s initial design showed primary age pupils looking very learningful. The brief to the designer must have omitted the relevant age.

The trouble with images of people on books is that they often represent stereotypes, or categories. Writing about social policy, changes to society and so on, we wanted an inclusive cover. If people are to be shown the reader has to see people of different ethnic origins, men and women in positive activities (I guess that’s where the bikes come in), in relationship with each other, and in our case, not representing the usual image of older people: passive, miserable, in decline.

230 road sign

We suggested no people. We suggested a neutral image: in our case it’s a rising or setting sun. And we were keen on getting a good strong colour, clear lettering and strong layout. Ideally we would have liked some of Eileen’s artwork, but this was beyond budget. We like the strength of the blue cover, and its ambiguous sun. I referred to the endorsement on the back cover in the previous post on marketing. We hope all this – title, design, blurby bits – will attract readers.

And finally …

… it’s all done. As I write this we are waiting for our printed copies to arrive. One has been seen somewhere in Britain. Publication day is only a few weeks ahead.

The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change, by Caroline Lodge, Eileen Carnell and Marianne Coleman will be published by Policy Press on 7th September 2016.

Copies of The New Age of Ageing will be available through the Policy Press website, at a 20% discount. It will cost £14.99 £11.99.

Related posts

On the Tricky Topic of Titles (November 2015)

We are writing monthly posts about the stages from bright ideas to publishing our book. Earlier posts include

Marketing our Book (August 2016)

Learning to be old by Eileen Carnell (July)

Ageing: it is not ‘them and us’, it is all ‘us’ by Marianne Coleman (June)

Getting feedback to improve our writing (May)

First Catch Your Publisher (April)

One Book, Three Authors (March)

Writers’ Residential (February)

 

Please subscribe by entering your email address in the box. You will receive emails about future posts.

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Marketing our Book

Writing a book is more than writing a book. It needs marketing. The three authors of The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change visited the publisher’s offices in Bristol, Policy Press, last week. It was in part an excuse for a day out and for the three of us, Eileen Carnell, Marianne Coleman and me, to meet up for the first time in several months. We received a very warm welcome and continue to be impressed by the many creative young women who work in publishing. The meeting was productive and we are excited about preparing for Publication Day on 7th September. Our job now is to help the publisher get the book to the people who want to read it.

274 New Age

Why have a publisher?

Producing a book, we have learned in the past, is a joint project between writers and publisher. Writing the text of a book is only one step. Without a publisher we could never have reached so many readers for our previous books. And again we find a publisher who helped to improve the writing and will handle promotional activities, distribution to bookshops and report on sales.

145 old hands

We can’t do without them. The expertise of Policy Press led us through the following promotional areas at our meeting.

The book cover, including endorsements

Our meeting with Jess, the publicity and marketing person at Policy Press, began by revising our summary of the book, the blurb, as it appears on the back cover. We had a brief discussion about the word ‘prove’. The researcher in me balks at its use, but we decided it’s a good word to do some of the required work on the cover: Brought alive by the voices of people aged 50 to 90, it proves ageing is not passive decline but a process of learning, challenges and achievement.

We moved on to selecting the endorsements. We had suggested some people they might approach, and some of these people had come up with engaging quotes for the back cover and for inside the book. We are rather pleased with the selection, an eminent MP and a couple of professors and one or two other luminaries. They are all well known leaders in the field of policy, public discourse and research into ageing.

Their words make me blush: compelling case for radically different approach to later life, inspiring book, excellent and eminently readable, welcome light …We hope they will also encourage readers to open the book.

Pitching for articles and reviews

Eileen and Marianne discussing writing points for The New Age of Ageing

Eileen and Marianne discussing writing points for The New Age of Ageing

We plan to hook into some themes that are around at the time of publication, such as housing and suitable accommodation for everyone. We explored what will happen around that time and how to be invited into the discussions and add to the arguments. Our book challenges some widely-held assumptions, and raises issues that are often not heard, so we have to push to get our arguments across. This is where marketing and promotion gets interesting, because it is of course about engaging people in what we have laboured to write. This is not like selling baked beans, or offering quantity (BOGOF). We have something to say and we want to be heard. We believe in what we have written: the authors’ moral commitment is obvious, according to one testimonial.

We moved on to discussing where we would like to see the book reviewed: journals, current affairs, magazines, and so on

Social Media activities

Our twitter hashtag is developed, #newageofageing, and we plan to tweet like mad – well, those of us who have twitter accounts; and to promote the book on Facebook, Linked-In and through other connections. We talked about coverage on this blog, Bookword, and Policy Press’s blog and others we can get to. Any invitations? We would really like you to be involved.

Other activities

There are some other possibilities too: postcards, flyers, articles, bookshops, speaking events, radio shows … We each began compiling lists of possibilities.

During the meeting Jess mentioned that the book goes to the printers this week. Hard copies will be available soon. The approach of publication day is exciting. We are proud.

And in all this activity and excitement we found time for the three of us to discuss our next writing project. Watch this space!

Turning pages of a book by Mummelgrummel, February 2013 via WikiCommons

Turning pages of a book by Mummelgrummel, February 2013 via WikiCommons

The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change, by Caroline Lodge, Eileen Carnell and Marianne Coleman will be published by Policy Press on 7th September 2016.

Copies of The New Age of Ageing will be available through the Policy Press website, at a 20% discount. It will cost £14.99 £11.99.

Related posts

A Little Rant about Marketing Books Like Cornflakes on this blog in November

We are writing monthly posts about the stages from bright ideas to publishing our book. Earlier posts include

Learning to be old by Eileen Carnell (July 2016)

Ageing: it is not ‘them and us’, it is all ‘us’ by Marianne Coleman (June)

Getting feedback to improve our writing (May)

First Catch Your Publisher (April)

One Book, Three Authors (March)

Writers’ Residential (February)

 

Please subscribe by entering your email address in the box. You will receive emails about future posts.

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Learning to be old

There are three authors of New Age of Ageing. I am one. I asked the other two to reflect on what writing the book meant to each of them. This month, on her return from holiday, Eileen writes about three important contradictions, conundrums and challenges about ageing.

  1. Performing old
  2. Covering the signs of ageing
  3. Not heading for the scrap heap.
Eileen on air at the BBC

Eileen on air at the BBC

This is what Eileen Carnell wrote for Bookword blog:

It has been an absolute joy to work with Caroline and Marianne over the last two years writing our new book The New Age of Ageing: How society needs to change. We interviewed fascinating people and carried out numerous searches. The most stimulating part of the process was the dialogue we had together creating new ways of understanding the issues and then finally creating our vision to conclude the book. The whole process was extremely challenging, fun and inspiring.

Reflecting now, just over a month before publication date, has been useful in highlighting some contradictions, conundrums and challenges about ageing that I have found particularly striking.

Performing old?

I was excited when I came across the idea that we learn to ‘perform’ or act old. As a feminist researcher I was aware of the concept of performing gender. Relating the idea to ageing was incredibly useful. I was amused by what Ruth said: ‘I am aware of changes, hearing myself making sitting down and standing up noises like an old person’. There are clear rules in our society about what old people should and shouldn’t do and wear and behave, just as there are clear expectations for women in our society.

Jenny’s remarks nicely illustrate the idea that we learn to perform old:

Me and my partner are experimenting with being old for a few days … he’s had a hernia repair, I pulled a muscle in my hip. … S’interesting the sorts of things that one might need to get ‘a young person’ in for eventually … changing the bed linen for starters.

I like the ironic tone of this message. Jenny knows the situation is temporary – a rehearsal. But beneath the message speaks truth – an agreed cultural understanding of performing ‘old’ and how relationships with family, friends and younger people change as a result. Those who fail to conform are criticised or ridiculed. When Mike was preparing for a triathlon, aged 70, friends said ‘You must be mad at your age, you crazy man of excess. Why don’t you just put your feet up?’ The dominant image of older people is of decline – take that road sign of bent old people with sticks for example.

230 road sign

A contradiction emerges. There is a powerful message in our society that it is our duty to age well and healthily. That means being super fit and active for as long as possible, regardless of social background, economic status or level of physical ability. A blame issue develops: ‘they should have looked after themselves’.

Reading the work of Lorna Warren and Amanda Clarke helped me make sense of this conundrum. They draw attention to the idea that in attempting to counterbalance the ubiquitous images of decline it is important not to create new unachievable oppressions of physically fit, creative, active, adventurous ageing (see note 1). When writing I recognised the temptation to overdo the positive aspects which gives weight to this new tyranny.

Covering signs of age?

Part of the tyranny is to hide signs of ageing – age denial. My sister Sheila, who was the prettiest of us three siblings, sent me a picture of her new face following Botox treatments. I was shocked and saddened, but in her 60s she was entitled to make this decision, although I felt it spoilt her looks, making her face looked ironed and her smile forced. But when I saw the headline: ‘Pageant Mom Gives Botox to 8-Year-Old’ that revealed the story of a mother administering Botox to hide her daughter’s wrinkles I was horrified (note 2). We three authors spent a long time considering our own attitudes towards the cover up. We agreed that this example of seeking perfection was an extreme form of cultural oppression. But where do you draw the line? Opinion is divided. Some see the use of cosmetics and treatments as empowering. It is clear that beauty ideals dominate many women’s lives and there is a growing belief that ageing is like a disease that can be cured. Subsequently the cosmetic business exploits women’s fears. I have come to the conclusion that if we persist as a society in hiding age then we will never re-educate ourselves to see beauty in the faces and spirits of older people.

Heading for the scrap heap?

Society does something strange to us as we age. We are no longer valued participants but seen as a burden, a problem or redundant. While many older people want to contribute they find it difficult to find ways to share their skills. Ray expressed his frustration after he retired from his role as a surgeon in a teaching hospital:

It’s such a waste. I could be a mentor or use my wisdom in other ways in an advisory capacity. I have so many transferable skills and it’s as if nothing I did in my professional life has any value any more. I feel I am on the scrap heap.

This is so sad. The challenge is to create structures and forums so that older people can share their wisdom and experience rather than leave it to chance.

I met an inspiring retiree, called Mo, who moved to a village in South Africa to set up a school. She said:

For me the way forward is clear – to tap into the global wisdom of so many who have reached retirement. There is immeasurable wisdom which could have a huge impact on so many in the world today.

I like the clear statement that old people need to be recognised as ‘assets rather than burdens … active contributors, not passive recipients’ (note 3).

Many older people, like Mo, do find ways to benefit society. We came across many who are still active in local, national or international politics and are vociferous in campaigning for a better world and in fighting ageism. The penultimate chapter of the book celebrates their contributions demonstrating there is no shortage of older radicals.

 

References

(1) Warren, L. and Clarke, A. (2009) ‘“Woo-hoo, what a ride!” Older people, life stories and active ageing’, in R. Edmondson and H.J. von Kondratowitz (eds) Valuing older people: A humanist approach to ageing, Bristol: Policy Press, p 244.

(2) ABC News (2011) Pageant Mom Gives Botox to 8-Year-Old Daughter: How Young Is Too Young? May 12, 2011. By Hagan, K., Kunin, S. & Ghebremmedhin. S. via GoodMorning America. (Accessed 23.06.15).

243 New Age cover(3) Roberts, Y. (2012) One Hundred Not Out: resilience and active ageing. London: The Young Foundation.

The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change, by Caroline Lodge, Eileen Carnell and Marianne Coleman. To be published by Policy Press on 7th September 2016.

Related posts

We are writing monthly posts about the stages from bright ideas to publishing our book. Earlier posts include

Ageing: it is not ‘them and us’, it is all ‘us’ by Marianne Coleman (June 2016)

Getting feedback to improve our writing (May)

First Catch Your Publisher (April)

One Book, Three Authors (March)

Writers’ Residential (February)

 

Please subscribe by entering your email address in the box. You will receive emails about future posts.

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Filed under Books, Learning, Publishing our book, Writing

Ageing: it is not ‘them and us’, it is all ‘us’

There are three authors of New Age of Ageing. I am one. I asked the other two to reflect on what writing the book meant to each of them. Eileen has gone on holiday, so her reflections will appear in July. Marianne writes about three things:

  1. Her own learning, particularly how writing the book had clarified her thoughts about the ageing process and its implications for all of us.
  2. Writing the book also made her face up to her own attitudes, anxieties and concerns about ageing
  3. She also thought about the process of writing which was unusual as it involved collaboration between three of us and had to be fitted into everyone’s already busy schedules

This is what Marianne Coleman wrote for Bookword blog:

261 Marianne

  1. Clarifying my thoughts

What about the ageing process? Most importantly there are all the implications arising from longer life expectancy and also there are changing and more youthful attitudes amongst older people. Both of these mean the following:

We need to think differently about ourselves, recognise that the balance of age groups is changing and then do some adjusting.

We have to make sure that old people are properly provided for to live a dignified and useful life, but also see that they are the most tremendous resource and that life in older age can be fun and exciting.

We need to drop our stereotypes around ageing, most of which revolve around decline and the end of a useful life.

The change in attitudes means having more flexibility about employing people, and recognising that older people contribute massively as volunteers in the charity sector and in supporting each other and their families.

Above all we need to recognise that older people are not separate or different from the rest of the population. It is not ‘them and us’, it is all ‘us’.

It is not “them and us”, it is all “us”.

There are too many people who preach an opposite message of division between the generations even blaming older people for the economic and social problems of today. Constructive and clear sighted attitudes to older people, not blame, will help not only those who are old now, but those who will be old in 10, 20 or 50 years’ time. We need a new mind-set about ageing.

  1. My own attitudes to ageing

What about my own attitudes anxieties and concerns about ageing? I am the product of my time, belonging to a generation growing up in the 1950s and 1960s and our generation does not so willingly accept the stereotypes and expectations that are associated with ageing. Many of us see ageing differently now that we are those older people. Researching for and writing the book has given me even more of a perspective to stand back and see the changes relating to ageing in progress, and to recognise for example that beauty is not just in youth but also in maturity and decline. Dropping any lurking stereotypes about age, I have become less judgmental in the ways that I look at people of all ages. I can’t pretend that I have no anxieties about getting older. In common with the people we interviewed I am concerned about health issues and how they might impact on me and when.

One side benefit of researching and writing the book has been the opportunity to give some thought to death. Although we were interviewing older people about their attitudes to ageing it was surprising how little the topic of death came up. It seems that people avoid thinking about it and sometimes never discuss anything about it even near the very end of life. In one of the chapters I did write about death and what was said in interviews and in particular reading Atul Gawande’s book Being Mortal made me realise how important it is to be more open about this final stage of life and to talk to your family and close friends about what might be important to you at the end.

  1. Writing together

What about the process of writing? The best thing was the times that the three of us worked together to construct the outline of the book and then to fine tune it and finally to comment on drafts of chapters. This process only worked because we know and trust each other and have respect for what each of us says. Working together was creative and it was exciting to take an idea and expand it or make links that I had not seen before. The feedback on individual chapters was invaluable. It is very reassuring to be able to try out ideas and test them on your fellow authors. I wrote in a previous blog about the importance of feedback on drafts.

Not one but two books

Overall I can honestly say that writing the book was an enjoyable experience. But I am glad to take a rest, particularly as circumstances meant that at the same time that I was collaborating on this book I was also collaborating on a book on a completely different topic. That book is called Leading for Equality: Making Schools Fairer where my co-author is Jacky Lumby. I managed the process of writing two books at the same time by some careful timetabling and taking one chapter (of whichever book) at a time and seeing each chapter as a separate project. There were also times when there was a lull in the progress of one book as fellow authors had to turn their attention to other projects too. Writing two at the same time was challenging but very rewarding. The books are very different but both have fairness and social justice at their heart so the move from one book to another did not jar.

One problem now is that all the administration associated with book production (editor’s queries, questions about marketing the books, proofs etc.) is all arriving together. Still just take one thing at a time …

The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change, by Caroline Lodge, Eileen Carnell and Marianne Coleman. To be published by Policy Press on 7th September 2016.

243 New Age cover

Related posts:

We are writing monthly posts about the stages from bright ideas to publishing our book. Earlier posts include

Getting feedback to improve our writing (May 2016)

First Catch Your Publisher (April 2016)

One Book, Three Authors (March 2016)

Writers’ Residential (February 2016)

 

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Getting feedback to improve our writing

Not all feedback helps to improve writing. Have you ever-experienced killer feedback? It’s the kind of feedback that makes you feel ashamed, humiliated and as if you wanted to put away the writing for ever. Everyone I know has received it at some stage. I remember the reviewer’s comment on an article I’d submitted to an academic journal. This was the sentence that did it: If the author aspires to an academic position they should learn how to reference. It was doubly killing as a) I was already a university lecturer and b) there was nothing wrong with the referencing. Nevertheless I abandoned the article on the spot.

Yet feedback can be very helpful. The three authors of The New Age of Ageing sought out readers to provide different types of feedback, and to learn from and improve our writing by taking their comments into account. Here are our reflections on our learning from this process.

243 New Age cover

Marianne Coleman says

We have asked for and received feedback throughout the writing of the book: right at the start on the proposal; on individual chapters and on the full draft.

It was really important to get feedback on the proposal. The publisher asked us to suggest suitable people to read our initial proposal so that they got a view on the viability of the book. That feedback was positive and constructive, and we took it into account when finalising the proposal, which was the initial skeleton of the book.

Throughout the course of the writing we were getting feedback from each other. For me the best thing about having co-authors has been the process of shaping the individual chapters and the book through the wonderful discussions we had each time we met. We also gave feedback to each other on draft chapters and that was incredibly useful. Obviously this can only work when you trust each other and can be honest, open and respectful of each other’s work and feelings.

In a wide-ranging book like ours, we covered areas where we were not necessarily fully expert and it was vital that we checked our facts with people who were. Their invaluable feedback enabled us to have confidence in what we were saying, but we found that we had to use our judgment about how much of their advice and how many of their suggestions to incorporate. Sometimes the sophistication and detail of their arguments were too much for the general nature of the book and more suitable for a thorough exploration of their particular area of expertise. This meant that sometimes after incorporating expert suggestions, they were trimmed back for the final draft.

A particularly useful feedback came from one of our readers at the point where we had a nearly complete draft. She came back with some vital over-arching comments including that we had not really established the standpoint from which we were speaking. This feedback made us think hard and helped us sharpen our thoughts and message for the final version.

The most recent feedback came in the form of editor’s queries. Although these tended to be mainly about consistency of spelling, punctuation and missing references, sometimes the editor has picked up a badly expressed thought that can be refined and improved for meaning.

But that is not the final feedback. That will come from our readers!

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Eileen Carnell writes

What we know for sure is that feedback can help authors become much better writers. But asking for, writing and getting feedback can be a tricky business. The process can be emotional and needs to be done with care. Here are 7 important points about feedback.

  1. You have to trust the readers of your work.

You need to have a good relationship and be prepared for the experience to be reciprocal. You are asking people to be generous with their time and be encouraging while providing authentic critique. Providing effective feedback is a highly skilled process. It’s about providing information, not about giving advice.

  1. All information about your writing can be useful.

Information can vary from seemingly small technical suggestions to comments about the overarching themes, consistency of arguments, important missing elements and the value of the project.

  1. Information provided is for the writer to work with.

As one reader said: ‘… just things which would have made my own reading of it easier – for you to take or leave as you feel fit,’ indicating that he knew that the writers are decision makers, not passive recipients of the comments.

  1. It can be helpful to ask readers for specific information.

We were particularly keen to know whether the voices of the three different authors were knitted together across the book and were keen to know if male readers would feel included.

  1. Getting feedback can be an emotional process.

Constructive criticism from others may feel like a criticism of the person rather than a critique of the writing as Caroline suggests when talking about ‘killer’ feedback. This may be even more the case when writing fiction.

  1. It can be helpful to get feedback from people who don’t know much about the themes or who are not experienced writers themselves.

Non-experts may ask questions that indicate that further explanation is needed, whether the writing is clear and if the argument is consistent.

  1. There are different ways of relaying information about others’ writing.

Everyday use of the term feedback (the dominant view) suggests the reader presents information to the writer – a one-way process. We describe this feedback as Gifts (see note). In other situations the nature of feedback has a social dimension, rather like Ping-Pong, where ideas are tossed back and forth and involve making connections. There are shared insights and new meanings established. Feedback here is a two-way process. The third example, our favoured kind, is what we define as Loops. Here there is an equal power dynamic in which new knowledge and concepts are created through dialogue.

255 Fbk for L cover

Caroline adds

On a writing course once, I was reminded that you cannot stand alongside everything you write and explain to the reader what they have not understood. In fact it is rare to receive comments directly about your writing. So when you get the chance, listen to the comments, take them into account and learn from them. You don’t have to agree or act on all of it. I try to remember this.

We would like to thanks the readers of the whole book who took on a huge, time-consuming task. We are very grateful for their generosity and expertise. We are also indebted to the many readers of individual chapters who made really helpful observations. Even though there were three of us writing this book getting feedback breaks the isolation of writing and it is really good to get a range of different perspectives.

Note: Askew, S & Lodge, C (2000). Gifts, Ping-Pong and Loops – linking feedback and learning, in Askew, S. (Ed) Feedback for Learning. London: Routledge.

The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change, by Caroline Lodge, Eileen Carnell and Marianne Coleman. To be published by Policy Press on 7th September.

Related posts

We are writing monthly posts about the stages from bright ideas to publishing a book. Earlier posts have included

First Catch Your Publisher (April 2016)

One Book, Three Authors (March 2016)

Writers’ Residential (February 2016)

A post focussing on relationships in the feedback process is Critique Etiquette: the Ultimate Guide for Giving and Receiving Feedback by Angela Ackerman on Writers in the Storm blog in March 2015

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What I write about when I’m not writing fiction

My good news is that I’m getting back to revising my novel. Thank you, good friends, who have enquired about its progress over the last 12 months. My bad news is that the progress has been very slow, and was much delayed for about 9 months. In fact I put the novel back in its drawer again for a while. I just couldn’t work on it at the same time as on the book I have just finished with my two co-authors: The New Age of Ageing.

145 writing keyboard

Writing fiction and non-fiction

I have tried and failed on several occasions to keep two large writing projects on the go at the same time – one non-fiction and the other a novel or short story. It just doesn’t seem to work. I am wondering why. In part it is because they require conflicting skills.

The New Age of Ageing, and non-fiction writing generally, requires methodical and thorough research, solid arguments, a sequence of writing that reflects the ideas under discussion. Some skills needed are the same as for fiction, such as hooking interest early, clarity and presenting factual information that relates to people’s lives. What I don’t need is to go shooting off after a new narrative idea, or to leave the reader in suspense at the end of a chapter. No, every assumption and connection needs to be considered, verified, scrutinised. Flights of fancy must be followed by reasoned hypothesis.

Structural problems of the two genres are very different. For the novel I have a plot in 23 chapters. I have been challenged by the novel’s structure, deciding on advice to change to alternating chapters having originally written it in alternating pairs. The change resulted in an improved novel but hours of confusion as I had to re-label everything on my computer and on the hard copies. You need to be well organised about peripheral things when writing a novel. Well I do, being a planner rather than a pantser. Zadie Smith referred to micro managers and macro planners in an influential lecture at Columbia University in March 2008. I am happy to quote her descriptions, because I admire her work and recently wrote a post challenging a comment she made about writing and therapy.

You will recognise a Macro Planner from his Post-its, from those Moleskines he insists on buying. A Macro Planner makes notes, organises material, configures a plot and creates a structure—all before he writes the title page. This structural security gives him a great deal of freedom of movement. It’s not uncommon for Macro Planners to start writing their novels in the middle.

I am a Micro Manager. I start at the first sentence of a novel and I finish at the last. It would never occur to me to choose among three different endings because I haven’t the slightest idea of the ending until I get to it, a fact that will surprise no one who has read my novels.

Structure for the book on ageing posed different challenges. Each chapter required a great deal of revision, recasting, editing, removal, filling gaps. It often seemed that I had all the right ideas but in the wrong order. I also had two co-authors to whom reference needed to be made for everything as they are also responsible for the content. Their feedback notes were invaluable, our talk was even better.

I can get very passionate about ageing and the issues and challenges that are not getting enough attention. I loved writing our manifesto for the book, getting clearer and clearer what it was we wanted to say. I loved the process of taking our combined ideas and moving them to a place I could not have gone on my own. So my involvement in writing that book was social as well as requiring some good research and communication skills.

243 New Age cover

Writing my novel is more isolating. To write the novel or the book on ageing I sit for hours in my writing room, looking out occasionally at Dartmoor and its changing weather patterns. Sitting. Tapping. Rearranging papers. An observer would not see the difference. But in the end, the novel has been a very isolated and individual activity.

So they require different skills, but that does not quite explain why I can’t do write fiction and non-fiction at the same time.

Working one project

About 9 months ago I decided to put the novel back in the drawer (yes again). After all we had a contract for our book on ageing and a deadline for completion. And I had two co-writers to answer to. And to be honest I had got to a sticky point in the revisions.

I had found that my fiction writing is not good enough at showing or even telling the reader about the emotional state of the protagonists. I tend to assume it’s obvious. In my best moments I think that is honouring the intelligence of the readers, allowing them to do some work. But when my intelligent readers said that I needed to work on this I can only agree. It has taken me some rumination, reading novels and some guidance from my on-line course to help me see what I must do. That’s what I am working on now.

Blogging

94 Blog on tablet

I can’t concentrate on fiction and non-fiction writing at the same time. However, one genre of writing has proved itself compatible with both fiction and non-fiction – blogging. The Book Word blog has been building slowly but steadily throughout this time, and I have posted every five or six days. In the posts I explore writing issues, review books, continue the series on older women in fiction and am able to look at all things connected with books and writing that take my fancy.

Perhaps I can combine blogging with both fiction and non-fiction because blogging requires some creativity, some research, some care over the communication of the content. And I am my own publisher for the blog. It’s not a commercial undertaking, so if a post bombs there is no consequence except to my pride. The deadlines are close, but I can (and do) alter them to suit my life.

It’s back to the novel

So … I am taking the chapters and looking at the emotional arcs of the characters and hoping that all the reading and writing and thinking I have done will help me see afresh how to communicate the emotional life of my characters.

And I am doing all the other things put on hold while we finished The New Age of Ageing. That’s another post in preparation! What I do when I’m not writing. Watch this space.

Related posts

This was the 6th in a series on revising my novel, following an on-line course back in 2015. Previous posts

My purposes for the on-line course #1 January 2015

Progress On-line course: my learning #2 January 2015

Progress On-line course: post course plans #3 February 2015

On-Line Writing Course #4 Revising Structure and Plot March 2015

On-Line Writing Course #5 Deadlines August 2015

And here’s a post with some excellent ideas: 10 things to do while your MS is resting from Victoria Griffin Fiction blog in July last year.

The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change by Caroline Lodge, Eileen Carnell and Marianne Coleman, to be published by Policy Press in September 2016.

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First Catch Your Publisher

One of the most stressful parts of writing for publication is finding a publisher. We have had good experiences such as being invited to write a book on a particular topic; and stressful ones, like having a first draft but no publisher.

243 New Age cover

I’m delighted to say that Policy Press took on The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change, early in the writing process. Because of the tricky process we had been through – as Eileen explains – we were careful to target a publisher who would be interested in the book. They will be publishing it in September. We are very pleased that they have just been named the Independent Academic and Professional Publisher of the Year 2016.

I asked my two co-writers, Eileen Carnell and Marianne Coleman, to say something about the process of finding a publisher.

Eileen begins with a ballad called

The long and winding road*

We’ve walked the road before

243 Retiring Lives coverAs experienced authors we set out on a new collaborative expedition. We knew we had a book that was prescient. Reviews of Retiring Lives, our work with retirees, our membership of a retiring group, all revealed a demand for a more in-depth account of the long and complex process of retiring.

We were confident, we knew how to write and knew how to submit proposals. We knew the terrain, we had the map and compass. We were excited about approaching publishers – starting with those who had published our work before. We studied their checklists and adapted every proposal. We analysed the competition, re-wrote the synopsis, submitted draft chapters and waited.

Don’t leave me standing here

We sent proposals to eight publishers. One problem is that you can only approach one at a time. We left an interval of a month between sending material and chasing up a response. ‘A wonderful idea for a book,’ they all agreed, ‘but not the sort of thing for us’.

After all these rejections, friends suggested approaching an agent. We contacted six. Same story: ‘Great idea, but not our area’.

During this 18-month period of contacting publishers and agents, we completed the first draft of the book and polished and burnished chapters.

And many times we’ve cried

To say we experienced ups and downs would be a massive understatement. But the good thing about writing collaboratively is that the highs and lows hit one or other of us at different times. After a rejection we soon felt hopeful and excited again when we approached someone new. We were convinced every time that this was going to be the one. Throughout this period of misery and elation we refined our chapters, found further research articles and redrafted.

Dead-ends and roundabouts

Then we thought of self-publishing and attended courses and workshops to help us down this avenue. While fascinating we were not convinced about this route.

The seventh agent said:

This book is so nearly finished why not send it directly to a publisher. Look for a different sort of publisher, one who had a good, changing list that appeals to the sort of readers you want to attract.

So we approached Guardian Books.

Your destination is on the left

The editor liked the book very much but said it needed EDGE! It would be a ‘trade book’, intended for general readership. So we rewrote the whole book to address the reader directly, became more informal and modified our referencing system. This was a major change for us. We submitted – with the required EDGE. But it still wasn’t edgy enough and we had to do it all over again.

Retiring with Attitude was published by Guardian Books in the summer of 2014 and was top of their best-selling chart for ten weeks.

What did we learn?

Never give up

Get a contract before doing so much writing

* with apologies to Lennon and McCartney

Marianne and Eileen in Caroline's kitchen in January 2015

Marianne and Eileen in Caroline’s kitchen in January 2015

And Marianne wrote this about the proposal for The New Age of Ageing we made to Policy Press:

Writing the proposal is the most important single step in writing a book

The time we spent talking about and polishing the proposal was time well spent. As we have moved ahead with the writing process we have checked back to the proposal many times. Looking at it now that the book is finished I think we remained true to the initial vision, although there has been quite a lot of re-arranging of chapters and their content. As one of the three authors, I have only been involved in writing non-fiction so what I have to say may not apply to fiction, but in my view, writing the proposal is the single most important step in producing a book.

When I look back on the notes that I took from our first meeting, the first word I wrote down is ‘purpose’. The notes that followed sketch out not only purpose, but also some of the key themes that have continued to dominate our thinking as we worked our way through the writing. The first draft of the proposal emerged from those notes. Although the key themes and purpose stayed largely the same, I lost count of the number of times the whole proposal was revised. At one of the early meetings we actually read the draft out loud, which turned out to be an excellent way of picking up half finished thoughts and unfortunate wording.

What does a proposal cover?

The suggestions of what to include vary a bit from one publisher to another but the main headings are pretty similar for all. In the case of Policy Press they are:

  • Title and sub-title (we will come back to this thorny issue in another post)
  • Synopsis and aims (250 words, five key factors in bullet points and five key words)
  • Background information (e.g. why did you want to write this book?)
  • Target audience
  • Competition

Trying to make our ideas fit those headings sharpened up the thinking wonderfully!

In addition publishers need some practical details including the estimated word count, an idea of the timetable to completion, names of referees and author CVs. Policy Press were also keen to have a sample chapter to send out to referees with the proposal.

It was great to get feedback after the proposal and chapters had been read by the referees and the editor. We revised the proposal in light of the comments and it was then sent on for a final decision about whether or not we got that vital contract.

While it is important to have a good, well though through proposal it doesn’t mean you have to stick to it rigidly when writing as other ideas may occur to you and through writing you may come to understand things differently. For example, we added the final chapter, which includes our vision.

Related posts

In March we posted about collaborative writing: One Book, Three Authors. This was reported on Policy Press’s blog.

In February we posted about a residential writing retreat: Writer’s Residential

The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change is available to pre-order on the Policy Press website for £14.99 here.

In May we plan to write about getting and using feedback.

Over to you

What strategies can you recommend to find a publisher?

 

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One book, three authors

This post celebrates an important moment. Yesterday we sent the finished manuscript of our book to the publisher. It’s not the end of the process of course: we still have all the business of queries, proofs and other prepublication things to get through. And there will be some marketing activities. But the manuscript is as ready as we could get it. The New Age of Ageing: how society needs to change will be published in September by Policy Press. It was written by three people: Caroline Lodge, Eileen Carnell and Marianne Coleman. Most things are better together and writing a book is one of those.

The three of us

Writing a book is intense even before adding the dimension of three authors. Eileen and Caroline have written together for some time, books and articles for teachers, books and articles on retiring. We have familiarity with our ways of working and those things that really matter to us. The three of us are members of a Retiring Women’s Group. Marianne had been the reader for Retiring with Attitude, by Eileen and Caroline, and they wanted her skills and experiences to augment and complement theirs as they tackled the book on ageing. She has an established reputation from her research on women and leadership, for example Women at the Top.

236 WonTop coverWriting collaboratively intrigues people. ‘How do you actually do it?’ they ask. And indeed how do you align the different views of content, purpose, theme and style and how do you resolve conflicts? And then how does that translate into words?

Eileen and Caroline recorded a conversation about writing a previous book. Writing Together identified the four main ways we wrote together.

  • Side by side
  • Back and forth
  • Separate and coming together
  • Dolly mix of the above.

We did all these again, but less side-by-side, which was harder with three of us. Put another way: we talked, planned, wrote, reviewed, learned from each other through more talk and then planned and wrote again and talked and so on, and so on …

Meetings

Writing tog

You have to talk together if you are writing together. You have to talk a lot. You have to meet and discuss the issues, large and small, that are coming up in the writing. Early on we met to put together a proposal to a publisher, consider the interviews, and decide who would take the lead on what. A year in we looked at everything we had been doing and reshaped the book again.

Throughout we tried to align our three styles of writing and the content: some chapters have more edge, some have focussed more on information, some are more passionate, some more chatty. Latterly we talked to decide the order of the chapters, to take account of readers’ feedback.

I’ve lost count of the number of meetings we have had. We have had two residentials (a previous post described our final residential meeting in January) and many, many one day meetings. There is always lots of paper, and an agenda. We are organised and decide what to do before we break for lunch. We go on until we have finished. We have completed our work together more quickly as we went on. Always, the book is clearer in our heads after each meeting; always, our understandings of issues in ageing have moved forward through our talk.

Emails

In some ways writing together is like writing alone, but with emails: hundreds and hundreds of emails. Collaborative writing would be so much more difficult without electronic devices. We send drafts, feedback, queries, research papers, redrafts, more feedback, more queries and draw attention to likely books, TV and radio programmes. We move material from one writer to another, argue about who gets to include particular quotations, and who writes which bit. We discuss format (especially spacing), point out duplication and omissions, and cheer each other along. So far we have not sent any humorous clips of cats or photos of grandchildren. We said we send twenty in a week in the previous post, but Eileen suggested it might be as much as twenty a day at times.

The benefits

Marianne, Eileen and Caroline meeting at Kings Place in 2014

Marianne, Eileen and Caroline meeting at Kings Place in 2014

Two benefits stand out. Writing together improves our ideas and our writing. We share the stresses of writing to a deadline.

Dialogue leads to learning and better understanding of the material. It develops our understanding of our themes through discussion. It allows us to articulate our understandings in words to each other, then sharpen and refine them through talk. Feedback improves our writing as we learn from each other.

Our life experiences and different perspectives mean we have a rich combination of good stuff – our different sorts of families and lifestyles, ways of living, outlook on life, passions and prejudices, and our own very distinct experiences of others around us ageing and dying have meant that we can draw on those to illustrate particular issues about ageing.

In the two years we have been engaged on this book we have each had more or less productive periods. Some have been caused by holidays, writing other books, other activities and life events. We tend to divide up tasks: we all did interviewing; Caroline communicates with the publisher; Marianne and Eileen with our main readers. Having three of us means we can rely on the others to hold the process for a time and to be supportive. It also means the whole weight of the project and our commitment to the publisher does not fall on one person. Shared writing means sharing the burden of writing.

Yet again it affirms that writing is a social activity.

A celebratory haiku

Half my voice is you.

Some notes can only be reached

Singing together.

For Christmas 2012, Caroline commissioned this haiku from David Varela for Eileen. We were working on Retiring with Attitude, just the two of us at that time. Now we would have to amend it to ‘A third of my voice …’ which would unhaiku it. But the sentiment is the same.

Related posts

An earlier post focussed on our learning. Writing Together (part 2) – what have we learned? April 2013

In April we will write a post about the processes involved in taking a book from a good idea to its publication.

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