Tag Archives: diversity

The Man Booker Prize 2015 The Winner

And the winner of The Man Booker Prize 2015 is …

Marlon James (Jamaica) – A Brief History of Seven Killings (Oneworld Publications)

206 Brief History Booker Cover

Two words dominated the broadcast of the award last night: diversity and voice.

Diversity

Opening the prize to writers in English from anywhere in the world has resulted in a wider range of authors on the long and short lists. There are women, people of colour, eminent established writers as well as newbies. Just what the best of published fiction should be.

Voice

I understand that A Brief History of Seven Killings is told in several voices. Michael Wood (chair of the panel of judges) referred to the diversity of voices in his comments about the short list. Again, fiction at its best shows the reader the world from new and sometimes various perspectives. It’s what it does.

All that razzamatazz?

199b The Man Booker Prize 2015 LogoSome folk do not like the hoopla that surrounds the award of the Booker. But I think it’s great that attention is brought to great fiction by the award, and that fiction and fiction writers should be given special treatment every now and again. Public acclaim for writers and their craft is rare. And apart from to Marlon James, his agent and publisher, it doesn’t really matter who wins. What matters is that fiction matters. Our attention is brought to lots of very good books published in the last year.

Here is the rest of the short list.

Tom McCarthy (UK) – Satin Island (Jonathan Cape)

Chigozie Obioma (Nigeria) – The Fishermen (ONE, Pushkin Press)

Sunjeev Sahota (UK) – The Year of the Runaways (Picador)

Anne Tyler (US) – A Spool of Blue Thread (Chatto & Windus)

Hanya Yanagihara (US) – A Little Life (Picador)

And here are the books that were on the longlist, or Man Booker ‘Dozen’, of 13 novels, announced in July:

Bill Clegg (US) – Did You Ever Have a Family (Jonathan Cape)

Anne Enright (Ireland) – The Green Road (Jonathan Cape)

Laila Lalami (US) – The Moor’s Account (Periscope, Garnet Publishing)

Andrew O’Hagan (UK) – The Illuminations (Faber & Faber)

Marilynne Robinson (US) – Lila (Virago)

Anuradha Roy (India) – Sleeping on Jupiter (MacLehose Press, Quercus)

Anna Smaill (New Zealand) – The Chimes (Sceptre)

9781784630232frcvr.inddNot the Booker Prize

And with less hoopla the Man Booker Prize is shadowed every year of the Guardian’s Not The Booker Prize, organised by Sam Jordison. More attention for more great fiction, mostly by less well known authors. And in case you didn’t read about it here are the results in order of votes received:

  1. Fishnet by Kirstin Innes
  2. Things we have in Common by Tasha Kavanagh
  3. The Good Son by Paul McVeigh
  4. The Artificial Anatomy of Parks by Kat Gordon
  5. A Moment more Sublime by Stephen Grant
  6. Dark Star by Oliver Langmead

So much good reading here. 19 novels, no doubt all brilliant. So far I have read three. So many great books to read.

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