Bookword in Iceland

Reading and travelling are both experiences of visiting new worlds. I like combining them and set about finding bookish connections when I’m on the move. I went to Iceland in February. Not my idea, but my brother is celebrating what people call a ‘big birthday’ and I said I would go with him. He hoped to see the Northern Lights. I’m up for such things, especially when I get to visit a new place. Here are some bookish reflections on my brief time in Iceland.

Strangers in Iceland

In 2009 Sarah Moss went to live in Iceland with her partner and children. She had a contract for a year with the University of Reykjavik. 2009 was the year following Kreppa, the Icelandic term for the financial crash. Kreppa ended the years of silly and false money-making in Iceland. People were suffering.

Sarah Moss is a novelist, author of Night Waking (2011) and The Tidal Zone (2016), both excellent novels published by Granta. The book she wrote about her time in Iceland is categorized as ‘travel’. It is not like any travel book I have read. It is more of a what-I-noticed-when-we-lived-in-Iceland-for-a-year kind of book. It is called Names for the Sea: strangers in Iceland. I recommend it even if you are not planning a visit.

From Names for the Sea I got the impression that Icelandic people may look and behave like other Western people, but actually they are very different. Icelandic people have sense of themselves as distinct, and what it means to be Icelandic, and a pride in their country and culture. They like the perception that theirs is the safest country in the world (1.1 murders a year are committed on average. Sadly, the week before we visited, Birna, a young girl was murdered. There were searches and a vigil and a man from Greenland has been arrested.)

Our sense of Iceland, as tourists, was that we should not be stressed. They had everything covered. Coaches and minibuses crisscrossed Reykjavik, fetching tourists from hotels and taking them on tours, information always provided about the arrangements. Even when our minibus broke down on the way back to the airport, a substitute was quickly fetched, and we proceeded with very little problem, delay or stress.

During her residence Sarah Moss found food banks, half finished blocks of flats and a poor exchange rate. We did not see the first two, but it was not cheap if you kept calculating the cost of things in £££s.

‘Icelanders knit everywhere,’ said Sarah Moss (281). The only person I saw knitting was a woman in the wool shop I visited, who demonstrated the way in which they hold their needles and wool. Icelandic sweaters and other necessary warm garments are widely available. I bought some yarn – how could I not?

I also learned from Sarah Moss that Icelanders take a coat with them all year round. In February this was not really in doubt. But in Reykjavik, we had rain and wind and the worst combination of these I have experienced this winter. But the temperature during the day never dropped below freezing. Out of the city it was another story.

Independent People

And now I am wading through Halldor Laxness’s novel Independent People. It’s a long story (more than 500 pages), an epic, about Bjartur a farmer in the desolate countryside, who is determined to become independent, who sees independence as the ultimate goal of all his labours. And labour he does, against the elements, bad fortune, hapless neighbours, the death of his first wife and a determined child. And Bjartur pays the price for his stubbornness.

Set in the early twentieth century, but describing life as it had been lived for many centuries, Laxness spares no detail of the crofters’ lives. Meetings of the men, coffee, rounding up sheep, falling into the Glacier River, the governance, relationships with neighbours … it’s all here. Especially the snow and the coffee.

Pingvellar National Park

What, I wondered, is the value of independence in an environment where cooperation and collaboration are clearly more likely to achieve desired outcomes?

Halldor Laxness, 1906 – 1998, published his novel in 1934-5. He produced other novels and translations, and wrote for the theatre. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1955.

Halldor Laxness 1955

Other bookish things

I need to reconnect with the Icelandic Sagas. The shops offered a hefty and attractive Penguin edition, but it seemed crazy to add such an object to our suitcase and to pay the Icelandic price. Iceland was only settled from 870. People had lived there before, but not successfully. The inhospitable landscape and climate would put off most folks. This is the stuff of good stories.

One of the many, many tours offered to tourists was The Game of Thrones Tour. We swam in the Blue Lagoon instead.

Our hotel had a bookshelf for guests. Prominent in the collection was H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald, one of President Obama’s recommendations, and one of mine.

I’m not a fan of Nordic-noir, or whatever genre in which you would include Icelandic thrillers. There are plenty.

Go to Iceland! It’s another country; they do things differently there.

Book details

Names for the Sea: strangers in Iceland by Sarah Moss (2012) Granta 358pp

Independent People by Halldor Laxness (1934-5). Translated from the Icelandic by James Anderson Thompson and first published in 1946, in translation. Available in the Vintage edition. 544pp

And go to TripFiction’s website to find other location-based fiction.

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12 Comments

Filed under Books, Travel with Books, Travelling with books

12 Responses to Bookword in Iceland

  1. Morag

    Thanks for a really interesting post. I enjoyed Names for the Sea. Although you don’t like Nordic Noir ( and I hate crime novels) I’d recommend Burial Rites by Hannah Kent. It’s a really accomplished first novel about a real murder in the 19th century. It’s a gripping page turner and conveys just how grim life was – even for those with education. For poor labourers or servants, on isolated farms, life was bbleak. Do give it a try.

  2. Anne Gore

    I tried to read Independent People but gave up. I was having to steel myself to open the book. But I suppose one can say that the writing was very powerful but sometimes I need my reading to uplift me and not bring me down!!!!We loved our trip to Iceland 10 years ago now and I would certainly recommend it- I am trying to persuade our family to visit. I think they would all find the geography and the landscape amazing- don’t you agree? Plenty of material for Oli’s Active Planet project. And as for swimming in hot mineral pools- well I think it is just about the best experience out- heat, water and healing minerals.

    • Caroline

      Hi Anne,
      I think you have caught my feelings about Independeent People. Thanks for enthusiastic responses to the other aspects of Iceland. I think Oli would love it. I was heard to say this more than once!
      C xx

  3. What an ace post! There is so much good literature set in Iceland and you have picked some goodies. One day soon I am going to have to visit to experience what I read….

  4. Monty

    Nice comments re a very enjoyable trip. Well impressed with Icelander’s very pleasant and calm efficiency. Unlike you I have enjoyed Nordic Noir and have now been to the library for an Icelandic Noir experiment. Not managed to start it yet. Thanks for celebrating my big number with me. Not so long till your turn!

    • Caroline

      I guess brothers have a few privileges such as commenting on one’s age. Great trip. Enjoy the library choice. Thanks for this comment and the trip.
      Caro xx

  5. Fascinating post. I will let you know how we get on in Reykjavik. Glad to hear your trip went well. Welcome home.

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